alienist

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alienist

An obsolete term for a
(1) Psychiatrist;
(2) Forensic psychiatrist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wigmore envisioned a subscriber base of "10,000 persons, including prosecuting attorneys, judges, police officials, prison officials, medical men, alienists, psychologists, sociologists, and philanthropists." (23)
Rather than admit this, the "alienists," as Brimelow dubs the elites, have kept the door wide open, without the support of the American people, while tilting the mix in favor of immigrants from the Third World.
The reliance on this device indicates that the artist is apprised of contemporary practices in the specialized domain of psychiatry and familiar with French alienists' insistence on the empirical observation of mental states.
(For a while, physicians who specialized in mental disorders were called alienists, because of this.) The French Revolutionaries, always ready to break with established custom, put Pinel in charge of an insane asylum in 1793, and there he struck off the chains of the inmates and began to make systematic studies of their conditions.
His son, Pliny Jr., became one of the foremost alienists (psychiatrists) in the country, a pioneer in the treatment of the mentally ill.
Part and parcel to this were also the connections frequently drawn by alienists and literary critics between imaginative power and mental imbalances.
First, there are the "mind doctors," otherwise known as "'alienists, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychoanalysts and psychotherapists ...
(9) Reflecting the "sociological jurisprudence" of the period, Chicago judges and prosecutors were also quick to invite social scientists and other experts into their courtrooms, and psychologists, "alienists," and physicians often testified in homicide cases.
On the other hand, the "poet-philosopher" denounces the philosophical ambitions of contemporary alienists who regard themselves as the heirs of the former "physician-philosophers." (2) In the prose poem "Assommons les pauvres!" Baudelaire challenges an alienist named Lelut who has written a book on Socrates's insanity.
In 1840s America, Southern alienists had already added to the sub-categories of insanity by identifying something they called drapetomania: a slave's "uncontrollable urge to run away from slavery." We must imagine these nascent psychiatrists, these men practising mindcraft before it was an accepted branch of medicine: serious men in black frock coats and high hats, genuinely unable to fathom the slave's desire to be free except as a form of pathology.
The medical profession complained incessantly about the rules, and in lectures, articles and books alienists argued that they alone possessed the necessary qualifications to judge criminal responsibility.
Dana called the zoophil-neurosis, their love of animals seems to involve an actual hatred of human beings." Diana Belais' antivivisection exhibit appeared at the state fair in Syracuse in the summer of 1910, provoking the Medical Record to cry, "These people are afflicted with the mental disease which the alienists [psychiatrists] diagnose as zoophil-psychosis." They consist of "women who coddle their pets and love them more than babies."(23)