alienation


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Related to alienation: Parental alienation

alienation

 [āl″yen-a´shun]
1. estrangement from society; feelings of being an outsider, foreigner, or outcast.
2. estrangement from one's self; feelings of unreality or depersonalization.
3. alienation of affect; isolation of ideas from feelings, avoidance of emotional situations, and other efforts to estrange one's self from one's feelings.

a·li·en·a·tion

(ā-lē-en-ā'shŭn),
A condition characterized by a lack of meaningful relationships with others, sometimes resulting in depersonalization and estrangement from others.
[L. alieno, pp. -atus, to make strange]

alienation

(āl′yə-nā′shən, ā′lē-ə-)
n.
1. The act of alienating or the condition of being alienated; estrangement: Alcoholism often leads to the alienation of family and friends.
2. Emotional isolation or dissociation.

alienation

[āl′yənā′shən]
Etymology: L, alienare, to estrange
the act or state of being estranged or isolated. See also depersonalization. alien, adj., alienate, v.
(1) The feeling of being apart from or unattached to others; estrangement felt in a setting viewed as foreign, unpredictable, or unacceptable, as occurs in depersonalization; the sensation that one has been removed from friends, family or one’s usual social setting; cultural estrangement
(2) The sense of being removed from one’s own emotions—alienation of affect

alienation

Psychiatry
1. The sensation that one has been removed from friends, family or one's usual social setting; cultural estrangement. See Depersonalization.
2. The sense of being removed from one's own emotions–alienation of affect.

a·li·en·a·tion

(ā'lē-ĕn-ā'shŭn)
A condition characterized by lack of meaningful relationships with others, sometimes resulting in depersonalization and estrangement from others.
[L. alieno, pp. -atus, to make strange]

alienation

1. A state of estrangement from, or inability to relate to, other people, concepts, social norms, or even oneself. Alienation, especially of the latter type, may be a feature of psychiatric disorder, but equally it may result from an accurate perception of the social environment.
2. A feeling that one's thoughts and emotions are under the control of someone else or that others have access to one's mind. One of the symptoms of SCHIZOPHRENIA.

alienation

isolation or separation from the standard.

Patient discussion about alienation

Q. my dad has msa, he has recently started seeing things, eg aliens, government consp.ext not fully reconzing lov does not reconize loved ones while having these episodes, becomes anxious and ill manered just not like my dad at all, he's so quite and polite normally.

A. Multi Systems Atrophy = MSA

Try this:
http://www.credencegroup.co.uk/Eclub/ses/sessearch.php?q=atrophy&pvdc=0
Get in touch with the credence group - they know very very much.

More discussions about alienation
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, when employees perceive other colleagues' territorial behaviors, the norm of reciprocity indicates that they may provide negative feedback and take actions that will reduce cooperation and increase social alienation (Poortvliet & Giebels, 2012).
Hypothesis 2a: Mastery climate will moderate the relationship between territoriality and social alienation, such that a higher level of mastery climate will weaken this relationship.
For Jaeggi (2014: 1), alienation is a "relation of relationlessness".
According to the essentialist logic, alienation involves a deficient relation to/departure from an essential self which is ontologically prior to one's social context (Jaeggi 2014: 78).
She likens the lack of understanding around parental alienation to domestic violence--it used to be seen as a private problem between two people but, once domestic violence was proven to be a systemic issue that impacts society and causes devastation in families, "that's when people started to take it seriously.
Because parental alienation is done to a child, as opposed to being a direct child-to-parent interaction, the definition of attachment may need to be expanded or reexamined.
South Dakota has judicially recognized alienation of a child's affections since the 1991 case of Hershey v.
Bitter, protracted litigation may transform 'reasonable' alignment with one parent into outright rejection of the other, and some cases of severe alienation may be effectively impossible to reverse during childhood.
However there exists little empirical evidence to support the assumption of bipolarity between work alienation and work engagement.
This claim implies that overcoming alienation consists not in recovering an original but now obscured subject-object relation, but in taking possession of the world in a way that first establishes a mutually constituting relation between self and world.
alienation from work has a significant relation with the geographical location, type of work, satisfaction of income and salary, human relations quality with other employees and managers, uncertainty, stress and marital status.