alienate

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alienate

(āl′ē-ĕ-nāt″) [L. alienus, someone else's, alien]
To isolate, estrange, or dissociate.
References in periodicals archive ?
She has assaulted two of the three children and she has further abused all three children by keeping them from their father physically and alienating them emotionally from him.
Campaign of denigration: denigration of the targeted parent completely, especially in the presence of the alienating parent.
Results indicated that SWDs perceive school life as more alienating than their peers without disabilities.
In addition, it is the federal government, not the school administrations, which carried out the policy of alienating Canada's natives from their culture by taking the children to residential schools hundreds of miles from their homes.
The Kennedys were all too eager to court King and the Civil Rights Movement to gain the black vote, but King was not invited to either Kennedy's inauguration or to his funeral for fear of alienating Southern Dixicrats.
The earliest and most influential studies of these links drew on Joyce Oldham Appleby's assessment of the early modern market as an impalpable, alienating entity.
Republicans competing for those same whites might wave the Confederate flag, but if they fear alienating blacks and moderate whites, they might emphasize religion instead, vowing to keep prayer and the Ten Commandments in schools and other public places.
Unlike Kovacevich, most CEOs cannot afford to take the risk of alienating analysts and investors.
Chavez commands popular support but he spent much of his election campaign railing against the "corrupt oligarchy and alienating the country's Catholic Church, media, private sector, oil workers and foreign investors.
We have learned to see more clearly both the alienating and the maturing aspects of this continuing story.
401(a) (13) (A); that section bars participants and beneficiaries from assigning, alienating and pledging their interests in qualified plans.
Yet while the life-size photographic portraits against mirrored surfaces are often taken as typical of the period, they exhibit an alienating, conceptual dimension that was not fully to unfold for another decade.