alien

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Related to alienage: ghetto, 14th Amendment

alien

an organism, usually a plant, that is not native to the environment in which it occurs, and that is thought to have been introduced by man.
References in periodicals archive ?
Romero, The Congruence Principle Applied: Rethinking Equal Protection Review of Federal Alienage Classifications After Adarand Constructors, Inc.
67, 82-83 (1976) (applying rational basis test to federal alienage classification); see also infra Part II (discussing jurisprudential obstacles to equal protection relief for undocumented immigrants); cf.
The Supreme Court reasoned that classifications based on alienage are inherently suspect because they are a "discrete and insular minorit[y]" for whom heightened judicial solicitude is appropriate.
124) Alienage laws, including existing state laws that regulate
Visible whiteness is not enough by itself to signify alienage or even immigrant status.
citizens, other cases have dealt more directly with the right to travel of persons who were eligible for welfare health benefits but were denied these benefits on account of their alienage or national origin.
Both of these provisions led to the first Congress creating alienage and diversity jurisdiction in the federal trial courts.
Laws challenged as discrimination based on race or alienage receive strict scrutiny, laws challenged as discrimination based on sex or legitimacy receive intermediate scrutiny, and all other claims of discrimination result in rational basis scrutiny.
applied rational basis review to federal alienage laws in recognition of
Understanding the substantive consequences of formal community membership in Australia has always hinged largely upon understanding the consequences of constitutional alienage, which, from the inception of Australian federation, was conceived of as the obverse of such membership: see David Dutton, 'Citizenship in Australia: A Guide to Commonwealth Government Records' (Research Guide No 10, National Archives of Australia, 2000) 59, quoted in Rubenstein, Australian Citizenship Law in Context, above n 9, 62.
Keith draws on a wide variety of work in both political theory and American studies that has theorised how the flexible concept of alterity works to sustain the veneer of democratic citizenship and although in our post-Agamben moment the claim may appear obvious to some, in his conclusion Keith suggests that seeing Guantanamo Bay as an aberration misses a much longer history of alienage.