algorithm


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

algorithm

 [al´go-rithm]
1. a series of algebraic equations.
2. a logical progression that is programmed for a computer.
3. a model for making decisions.
Algorithm. Model of a decision algorithm. ACC/AHA Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Unstable Angina and Non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction. JACC 2000, 36: 970-1062. Copyright 2000, by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association. Permission granted for one time use. Further reproduction is not permitted without permission of the ACC/AHA.

al·go·rithm

(al'gō-ridhm),
A systematic process consisting of an ordered sequence of steps, each step depending on the outcome of the previous one. In clinical medicine, a step-by-step protocol for management of a health care problem; in computed tomography, the formulas used to calculate the final image from the transmitted x-ray data.
[Mediev. L. algorismus, after Muhammad ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi, Arabian mathematician, + G. arithmos, number]

algorithm

(1) A sequential procedure for solving a mathematical problem.
(2) A step-by-step procedure for reaching a decision when choosing among multiple alternative options, linked to each other by a decision tree.

algorithm

Decision-making A logical set of rules for solving a specific problem, which assumes that all of the data is objective, that there are a finite number of solutions to the problem, and that there are logical steps that must be performed to arrive at each of those solutions NIHspeak A step-by-step procedure for solving a problem; a formula. See Back-propagation, Critical pathway, Genetic algorithm, Risk of ovarian cancer algorithm.

al·go·rithm

(al'gŏr-idhm)
1. A process consisting of steps, each depending on the outcome of the previous one.
2. clinical medicine A step-by-step protocol for management of a health care problem.
3. computed tomography The formulas used for calculation of the final image from the x-ray transmission data.
[Mediev. L. algorismus, after Muhammad ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi, Persian mathematician, + G. arithmos, number]

al·go·rithm

(al'gŏr-idhm)
A systematic process consisting of an ordered sequence of steps, each step depending on the outcome of the previous one.
[Mediev. L. algorismus, after Muhammad ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi, Persian mathematician, + G. arithmos, number]
References in periodicals archive ?
A simple implementation of the algorithm public class JavaSortAlgorithm extends SortAbsAlgorithm { SortOutput execute(Sortlnput input) { SortOutput result = new SortOutput (); java .util .Arrays .sort (input.
sudden increase of a system resource usage) by running each algorithm several times.
WHAT IF a large class of algorithms used today--from those that help us avoid traffic to algorithms that identify new drug molecules--worked exponentially faster?
A lot of so-called optimization problems--problems that find the best solution from all possible solutions, such as mapping the fastest route from point A to point B--rely on sequential algorithms that have not changed since they first were described in the 1970s.
For instance, as is explained in [27], RC5 structure can be modified and implemented in hardware for making the algorithm to run faster.
Expanding the key length is the base option in order to rise the algorithm security level, but this will need to work together with one of the techniques previously described that allow to enhance the performance due to the fact that a larger key will make the algorithm to run slower.
Due to the fact that the algorithm has a tendency towards undersegmentation, running it once or twice is usually the best approach, as other runs after that will not guarantee reducing the number of small regions and will just result in a performance drop.
The algorithm was selected to compensate for some of the inaccurate results the other algorithms might produce.
She set it out as a vertical algorithm (Figure 1) and explained her working in the following way: "Six goes into seven once, write down one and carry one and add it to the 'one' in the 17.
As for F5 algorithm, it is a algorithm that can be applied to images with the JPEG standard.
Machine learning is the field of computer science that deals with algorithms that make predictions and learn from the data, without being explicitly programmed.
Section 2 overview the characteristics of the recently proposed NAF conversion algorithms. In section 3, we describe the [SNAF.sub.W] algorithm in details.