alginate


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Related to alginate: sodium alginate

alginate

 [al´jĭ-nāt]
a salt of alginic acid, a colloidal substance from brown seaweed; used, in the form of calcium, sodium, or ammonium alginate, for dental impression materials.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt),
An irreversible hydrocolloid consisting of salts of alginic acid, a colloidal acid polysaccharide obtained from seaweed and composed of mannuronic acid residues; used in dental impression materials.

alginate

/al·gi·nate/ (al´jĭ-nāt) a salt of alginic acid; water-soluble alginates are useful as materials for dental impressions.

alginate

[al′ji·nāt]
a salt of alginic acid, extracted from marine kelp. The calcium, sodium, and ammonium alginates have been used in foam, cloth, a thickening agent for foods, pharmaceutical preparations, and gauze for absorbent surgical dressings. Soluble alginates, such as those of sodium, potassium, or magnesium, form a viscous sol that can be changed into a gel by a chemical reaction with compounds such as calcium sulfate; this makes them useful as materials for taking dental impressions.

alginate

A gelatinous polysaccharide extract from brown algae and salt of alginic acid, which is a linear polymer of mannuronic and glucuronic acids, found in the cell walls of algae. It is widely used in processed foods and in medicinal, industrial and household products, including swabs, filters and fire retardants.

Source
Laminaria spp and Macrocystis pyrifera; a chemically different version of algin is produced by the bacterium Azobacter vinelandii.
 
Dentistry
Alginate can be formulated with gypsum into a plaster like compound to take impressions for crown and bridgework.
 
Surgery
Alginates are used as foam, clotting agents and gauze in absorbable surgical dressings and packing.
 
Wound care
Alginate dressings are derived from seaweed made of soft non-woven fibres, and are available as pads, ropes or ribbons. Alginate dressings are extremely lightweight, absorb many times their own weight, form a gel-like covering over the wound, and maintain a moist environment. They are best used for wounds with significant exudate.

Pros
Especially useful for packing exudative wounds; do not physically inhibit wound contraction as does gauze; highly absorbent.
 
Cons
Requires a secondary dressing; too drying if wound has little exudate.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt)
An irreversible hydrocolloid consisting of salts of alginic acid, a colloidal acid polysaccharide obtained from seaweed and composed of mannuronic acid residues; used in dental impression materials.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt)
Elastic dental impression material composed of potassium alginate from kelp, calcium sulfate, and other ingredients; usually a powder to mix with water. Setting reaction cross-links alginic acid to form a semisolid.

alginate (al´jināt),

n a salt of alginic acid (e.g., sodium alginate), which, when mixed with water in accurate proportions, forms an irreversible hydrocolloid gel used for making impressions or molds of the denti-tion. See also hydrocolloid, irreversible.

alginate

a salt of alginic acid, a colloidal substance from brown seaweed; used, in the form of calcium, sodium or ammonium alginate, as foam, clot or gauze for absorbable surgical dressings. Also used as an irreversible hydrocolloid impression material in dentistry for making impressions of jaws in the preparation of orthodontic appliances.
References in periodicals archive ?
The alginate and alginatesilica entrapped laccase exhibited a relative activity of 70.
1,2 These have resulted in the production of a variety of new alginate products.
The different solutions were selected on the basis of the affinity of alginate for ions: [Ba.
entrapped into calcium alginate core and coated with poly-sulfone layer were simultaneously applied to evaluate their combined influence on MBR filtration performance.
Patients who displayed gagging during examination or the impression procedure with alginate impression material were selected.
The alginate is commercially obtained from farmed brown seaweeds such as Laminaria hyperborea, Laminaria digitata, Macrocystis pyrifera and Ascophyllum nodosum (Auhim and Hassan, 2013).
The MIT researchers aimed to modify alginate to prevent it from triggering this immune response.
Rather than keeping them at 37 degrees Celsius, in atmospheric oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide, encasing the stem cells in an alginate gel is shown to prolong their life for up to three days at ambient temperatures.
The process encompasses everything from harvesting the seaweed on Chilean beaches and in the seas off Chile, to importing the granulated and dried seaweed, to manufacturing the alginate and using it in cell culture to grow pluripotent stem cells at the institute in Saarland.