alginate


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Related to alginate: sodium alginate

alginate

 [al´jĭ-nāt]
a salt of alginic acid, a colloidal substance from brown seaweed; used, in the form of calcium, sodium, or ammonium alginate, for dental impression materials.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt),
An irreversible hydrocolloid consisting of salts of alginic acid, a colloidal acid polysaccharide obtained from seaweed and composed of mannuronic acid residues; used in dental impression materials.

alginate

A gelatinous polysaccharide extract from brown algae and salt of alginic acid, which is a linear polymer of mannuronic and glucuronic acids, found in the cell walls of algae. It is widely used in processed foods and in medicinal, industrial and household products, including swabs, filters and fire retardants.

Source
Laminaria spp and Macrocystis pyrifera; a chemically different version of algin is produced by the bacterium Azobacter vinelandii.
 
Dentistry
Alginate can be formulated with gypsum into a plaster like compound to take impressions for crown and bridgework.
 
Surgery
Alginates are used as foam, clotting agents and gauze in absorbable surgical dressings and packing.
 
Wound care
Alginate dressings are derived from seaweed made of soft non-woven fibres, and are available as pads, ropes or ribbons. Alginate dressings are extremely lightweight, absorb many times their own weight, form a gel-like covering over the wound, and maintain a moist environment. They are best used for wounds with significant exudate.

Pros
Especially useful for packing exudative wounds; do not physically inhibit wound contraction as does gauze; highly absorbent.
 
Cons
Requires a secondary dressing; too drying if wound has little exudate.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt)
An irreversible hydrocolloid consisting of salts of alginic acid, a colloidal acid polysaccharide obtained from seaweed and composed of mannuronic acid residues; used in dental impression materials.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt)
Elastic dental impression material composed of potassium alginate from kelp, calcium sulfate, and other ingredients; usually a powder to mix with water. Setting reaction cross-links alginic acid to form a semisolid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geographically, the global sodium alginate market is segmented into North America, Asia Pacific, Europe, Middle East & Africa and South America.
The annual production of alginate is approximately 30,000 metric tons.
It is found that the alginate third network of the TN gels crosslinked by trivalent cations ([Fe.sup.3+]) (E of 354.74 kPa, [[sigma].sub.f] of 929 kPa, [W.sub.f] of 4.7 MJ/[m.sup.3]) is much stronger and tougher than those crosslinked by divalent cations ([Ca.sup.2+]) (E of 152.27 kPa, [[sigma].sub.f] of 509.78 kPa, [W.sub.f] of 3 MJ/[m.sup.3]) and containing [Na.sup.+] cations (E of 35.26 kPa, [[sigma].sub.f] of 156.27 kPa, [W.sub.f] of 0.76 MJ/[m.sup.3]) (Fig.
3 Loosely Measure 7 cups of dry alginate into container Add about 6 1/2 cups coo water.
There are six keys of success in obtaining an impression with alginate material.
Experimental design and statistical analysis: The experiment was designed with optimization of nine factors including: i) optimization of alginate concentration, ii) CaCl2 concentration, iii) exposure time to CaCl2, iv) storage vessel, v) storage temperature, vi) storage time, vii) pre-treatment with KNO3, viii) mechanical removal of alginate gel and ix) synthetic seed composition.
Survival of probiotics was higher in the alginate microparticles added hi-maize (AHM) compared to the other treatments, since they presented lower release (1.76 log cycles) in relation to their initial count.
Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of glycerol, alginate, chitosan, AG, and ACG beads were recorded using a transmittance mode iS50 Thermo Nicolet Nexus 670 FTIR (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA) with a built-in diamond crystal.
It appears that the hardness of rice cakes containing alginate was more dependent on the soft continuous phase rather than on the hard starch granules, therefore leading to a softer texture.
"Our unique gel--a combination of alginate and collagen--keeps the stem cells alive while producing a material which is stiff enough to hold its shape but soft enough to be squeezed out the nozzle of a 3D printer," he highlighted.
Sodium alginate was chosen as the coating polymer, since it is a biodegradable polymer, derived from brown algae.