alfalfa

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alfalfa

A bushy perennial that is a rich source of vitamins C, D, E and K, which is used primarily as animal fodder, though health-food advocates have made many extravagant claims for its use, including cancer treatmnet; alfalfa is administered internally for alcoholism, caries and diabetes, as well as bladder inflammation, gastrointestinal complaints (bloating, constipation, indigestion) and halitosis.

al·fal·fa

(al-fal'fă)
(Medicago sativa) A form of ground cover used as animal feed and as a nutritional supplement in humans. Sometimes eaten in salads. Many drug interactions are reported.
Synonym(s): lucerne, purple medick.
[Sp., fr. Ar. al-fasfasah]
References in periodicals archive ?
El rendimiento del forraje y la persistencia de la pastura son consideraciones de importancia para tener en cuenta en el manejo productivo de las variedades de alfalfa (Odorizzi, 2015).
We observed no differences among normal, [N.sub.2]-fixing alfalfas, between [N.sub.2]-fixing and non-[N.sub.2]-fixing alfalfas, or between reed canarygrass and alfalfa.
"I interseeded it, meaning I placed the alfalfa among my existing shrubs and grasses to increase forage production and palatability," he says.
Grazing tolerance, disease resistance, and winter survival are the major factors affecting alfalfa stand persistence under grazing (Smith et al., 2000).
So it should be no surprise that alfalfa is still pioneering today.
In addition, it is not known how autumn defoliation alters the expression of specific cold hardiness genes whose expression has been consistently associated with genetic differences in alfalfa winter hardiness (Cunningham et al., 2001).
At the Soybean and Alfalfa Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland, geneticist Gary R.
Genetic differences in alfalfa winter survival have been associated with several physiological changes in overwintering organs.
Alfalfa has spread and become popular because of its productivity and high feed value.
Interviews showed that five of 14 Nebraska patients patronized a common restaurant chain (chain A) and that nine had recently eaten alfalfa sprouts.
Paul Sun, vice president of research-608/676-2237 or psun@dairylandseed.com; Mike Velde, alfalfa plant breeder-608/676-2237 or mvelde@dairylandseed.com; and Derry Abraham, alfalfa product manager-920/572-7363 or dabraham@dairylandseed.com