alert fatigue


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alert fatigue

The tendency of health care professionals to ignore prompts given to them by clinical decision support systems in electronic health records because of the excessive number or limited clinical significance of these records.
See also: fatigue
References in periodicals archive ?
So, I performed a PubMed search using "Alert Fatigue, Health Personnel" that revealed only 48 publications on this subject.
However, in many cases, the benefits have been compromised because they generate too many alerts and cause "alert fatigue," a phenomenon that arises when clinicians are exposed too often to too many alerts that are irrelevant to patient care.
In this study, >2 alerts were generated per patient encounter, possibly contributing to what some authors have described as "alert fatigue, " in which providers are inundated with BPAs and other alerts such that each individual alert becomes less meaningful (6, 12).
Take these steps to reduce alert fatigue. Healthcare Risk Management, 32(9), 103.
When the rate of unhelpful alerts far exceeds the rate of relevant alerts, clinicians begin to get distracted and attribute their inattentiveness to alert fatigue. (3,7) Alert fatigue is more than just an annoyance because it increases the risks of harm to patients and liability to providers.
This is known as alert fatigue (Overhage, Tierney, Zhou, & McDonald, 1997).
Cowan (2013) provided an excellent overview of decreased communication, dangerous "workarounds," and alert fatigue that can be associated with electronic medical records.
But hospitals are finding that "alert fatigue" is a serious problem if clinicians don't find the alerts useful.
This has actually worsened with the increasing availability of the electronic medical records, "alert fatigue," and will intensify with the approaching era of personalized medicine and the accompanying deluge of biomarkers, such as genomic, proteomic, and metabolic patient data.
Users are often overwhelmed by "alert fatigue." For instance, a doctor may make a decision to alter a recommended dosage based on a patient's age or other factors, and many systems cannot understand this, causing repeated--often annoying--alerts.
Gurwitz said, but then there's also the danger of "alert fatigue," when so many things are flagged that an overloaded clinician no longer pays attention.
EMWIN applications support filtering to eliminate "alert fatigue" and direct content to responders.