aldose reductase


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al·dose re·duc·tase

polyol dehydrogenase (NADP+); an oxidoreductase that reversibly converts aldoses to alditols (for example, glucose to sorbitol) with NADPH as hydride donor, an important step in the metabolism of sorbitol and in the formation of diabetes-associated cataracts.
See also: d-sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

aldose reductase

An NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.21) that catalyses the reduction of various aldehydes and carbonyls (e.g., glucose into sorbitol), which is the first step in the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism. Excess sorbitol in the eye, nerves and kidneys in diabetics leads to retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy.

aldose reductase

An enzyme normally present in the eye and elsewhere, which converts excess glucose–as occurs in DM—into sorbitol; excess sorbitol in the eye, nerves, and kidneys can lead to retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. See Aldose reductase inhibitors.

aldose reductase

An enzyme that makes up part of the metabolic pathway that converts glucose to fructose and sorbitol. Fructose and sorbitol may damage nerves, the retina, and the lens of the eye when they accumulate excessively, e.g., in poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chang et al., "Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract," Chemico-Biological Interactions, vol.
HIP exhibits potent [alpha]-glucosidase inhibitor activity, with I[C.sub.50] value of 297 [micro]g/mL, and aldose reductase inhibitor activity, with I[C.sub.50] value of 48 [micro]g/mL [39].
Lim, "Aldose reductase inhibitory activity of compounds from Zea mays L.," BioMed Research International, vol.
* Several previous studies have shown that the drugs which inhibit aldose reductase activity could be effective in the prevention of cataract formation.
Hyperoside, one of the major components of OSSC extracts, has shown excellent inhibitory effects toward rat lens aldose reductase (Lee et al.
One reason: An enzyme known as aldose reductase. Diabetes causes high glucose levels in the blood, and when it gets into the lens in excessive amounts, it can't be metabolized efficiently.
Long-term clinical effects of epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy: the 3-year, multicenter, comparative Aldose Reductase Inhibitor-Diabetes Complications Trial.
A unique anti-diabetic property of Amla is that it inhibits an enzyme called aldose reductase.(47,48) This enzyme produces a toxic chemical called sorbitol, which damages proteins in the eye to cause cataracts, and which more recently has been implicated in production of arterial stiffening and cardiovascular disease.(47-51)
In recent years, a significant discovery has been made through the studies on the inhibitory action of Hyp on eye aldose reductase (AR) which in mammals catalyzes the conversion of glucose to sorbitol that is one of the leading causes of diabetes complications such as cataract and neurological diseases.
For instance, the effects of several antioxidants such as vitamin E [7], melatonin [8] and date extract [1], fatty acid contained diets like Omega 3 [9], aldose reductase inhibitors [10] and also statins compounds such as atorvastatin [11] have been investigated.
The receptor targets for T2DM reported by many scientists till date are glycogen phosphorylase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1-beta (PTP-1[beta]), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), glucokinase, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-y), aldose reductase (AR), insulin receptor (IR), and so forth [13].