alcid

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Related to alcids: Alcidae, Atlantic puffin

alcid

members of the bird family Alcidae, the northern counterpart of the southern hemisphere penguin; includes auks, guillemots, puffins.
References in periodicals archive ?
We examined all relevant species of alcids that occur in the New York area during the month of February (Sibley 2000) including Common Murre (Uria aalge), Thick-billed Murre (Uria lomvia), Razorbill (Alca torda), Dovekie (Alie alie), and Black Guillemot (Cepphus grylle).
These terms are too strong for describing the territorial bahaviour of alcids in general, and a flightless one in particular.
The Great Auk, largest of the alcid group, was 70 cm high and probably weighed some 5 kg (Stonehouse 1968; Bedard 1969).
Among the important changes from historical listings accepted by Balar but not (yet) by the AOU are recognition of the tundra plovers (genus Pluvialis) as a family distinct from other plovers, treatment of the skimmers (Rynchops) as a family distinct from terns, and the sequential listing of the alcids before, instead of after, the skuas, gulls and terns.
Multiple molt centers or series among primaries have been documented widely among non-passerine families including albatrosses (Diomedeidae), alcids (A1cidae), falcons (Falconidae), parrots (Psittacidae), and owls (Strigidae) (Miller 1941; Langston and Rohwer 1995; Pyle 1997, 2008; Thompson and Kitaysky 2004), but only a few exceptions to distal and sequential replacement during complete prebasic molts have been documented in north-temperate passerines.
Fledgling alcids have a natural inclination to descend while fledging, presumably an adaptation for nesting on slopes and cliffs (Gaston and Jones 1998).
Part II contains information on birds from waterfowl through alcids as doves through passerines were included in Pyle 1997: Identification Guide to North American Birds, Part I (Slate Creek Press; Point Reyes Station, CA, USA).
We found no previous reports of Northern Fulmar actively preying on seabirds or procellariid species preying upon alcids.
They support staggering nesting populations of millions of alcids and other seabirds.
In the Northern Hemisphere, alcids are the ecological equivalent of penguins and, like penguins, are largely confined to areas of high productivity.
Although this guide's coverage is restricted to the European region, it covers the specialized topic of flight identification of seabirds, a group defined here as including loons, grebes, tubenoses, cormorants, waterfowl, skuas, jaegers, gulls, terns, alcids, etc.