Albatross

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Related to albatrosses: Diomedeidae, wandering albatross

Albatross,

large sea bird that figures prominently in Coleridge's poem, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner."
Albatross syndrome - Synonym(s): Münchausen syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Reaching a wingspan of 2.5 metres, black-browed albatrosses breed on these Sub-antarctic Islands during the austral summer, laying a single egg in October that will hatch in December.
I certainly don't want to leave them trust funds that are albatrosses round their necks.
Gliders would have a few limitations that albatrosses don't, however, Richardson said.
Every year long-line fishing boats set about three billion hooks, killing an estimated 300,000 seabirds every year, of which 100,000 are albatrosses.
International conservation agreements have been established that recognize the threat of longline fishing to seabird populations, most notably the United Nations (U.N.) Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) International Plan of Action for Reducing Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries (FAO, 1999) and the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP1).
This means that albatrosses can spend more time incubating their eggs, which improves their breeding success.
Albatrosses are the largest flying birds in the world but it's estimated around 80,000 of them are killed each year by long-line fishing vessels.
It's estimated around 80,000 albatrosses are killed each year by long-line fishing vessels
On the planet for 50 million years, albatrosses are the largest flying birds in the world, but it's estimated that around 80,000 of them are killed each year by longline and trawl fishing vessels.
We had no experience in raising baby albatrosses, so we looked for someone who did.
Huge albatrosses with wingspans of more than three metres soar above the cliffs and lighthouse at the Royal Albatross Centre, Taiaroa Head (www.albatross.org.nz).
In his journal entries between January and April 1769 Banks writes numerous reports of albatrosses killed for scientific curiosity and for food.