albatross

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Related to albatrosses: Diomedeidae, wandering albatross

Albatross,

large sea bird that figures prominently in Coleridge's poem, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner."
Albatross syndrome - Synonym(s): Münchausen syndrome

albatross

a large, 25 lb, ocean flying bird with a very wide wingspan, 10 ft, which enables it to glide for long distances at a height of about 50 ft above the sea. There are several genera, the commonest being Diomedea and Phoebetria. The commonest species is the Wandering Albatross, Diomedea exulans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further research on the diet and foraging patterns of Antipodes Island wandering albatrosses can help better understand what is happening to these birds.
Results indicate that about 57% of the ICCAT pelagic longline seabird bycatch was albatrosses.
Albatrosses are the largest flying birds in the world but it's estimated around 80,000 of them are killed each year by long-line fishing vessels.
It's estimated around 80,000 albatrosses are killed each year by long-line fishing vessels
On the planet for 50 million years, albatrosses are the largest flying birds in the world, but it's estimated that around 80,000 of them are killed each year by longline and trawl fishing vessels.
We had no experience in raising baby albatrosses, so we looked for someone who did.
Between 1885 and 1903, an estimated five million short-tailed albatrosses were taken from Torishima, a major breeding colony.
The first study of how individual wandering albatrosses find food shows that the birds rely heavily on their sense of smell.
I spent a happy hour chasing albatrosses with my lens.
Population declines of several species of albatrosses and petrels in the Southern Ocean are linked to longlining operations (Croxall and Prince, 1990; Brothers, 1991; Cherel et al.
Now a new initiative by BirdLife International, which the RSPB is a member, is hoping to reduce the numbers of albatrosses killed each year.
ALBATROSSES regularly make epic round-the-world flights when they are not busy breeding, scientists revealed yesterday.