alanine


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Related to alanine: valine, alanine aminotransferase, Beta alanine

alanine

 [al´ah-nēn, al´ah-nin]
a nonessential amino acid, also found at high levels in plasma.

al·a·nine (A, Ala),

(al'ă-nēn),
2-Aminopropionic acid; α-aminopropionic acid; the l-stereoisomer is one of the amino acids widely occurring in proteins.

alanine

/al·a·nine/ (Ala) (A) (al´ah-nēn) a nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins and also free in plasma.
β-alanine  an amino acid not found in proteins but occurring free and in some peptides; it is a precursor of acetyl CoA and an intermediate in uracil and cytosine catabolism.

alanine

(ăl′ə-nēn′)
n.
A nonessential amino acid, C3H7NO2, that is a constituent of many proteins.

alanine (Ala or A)

[al′ənin]
a nonessential, nonpolar (neutral) amino acid found in many food protein sources as well as in the body. It is degraded in the liver to produce important biomolecules such as pyruvate and glutamate. Its carbon skeleton also can be used as an energy source.
enlarge picture
Chemical structure of alanine

alanine

A simple, nonessential amino acid—CH3CH(NH2)COOH—found in most proteins, which is involved in glucose catabolism, especially in anaerobic conditions.

al·a·nine

(A, Ala) (al'ă-nēn)
2-Aminopropionic acid; α-aminopropionic acid; one of the amino acids widely occurring in proteins.
Alanineclick for a larger image
Fig. 19 Alanine . Molecular structure.

alanine (A, Ala)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in proteins. It has a NON-POLAR structure and is relatively insoluble in water. The ISOELECTRIC POINT of alanine is 6.0. See Fig. 19 .

al·a·nine

(A, Ala) (al'ă-nēn)
2-Aminopropionic acid; α-aminopropionic acid; one of the amino acids widely occurring in proteins.

alanine (al´ənēn),

n a nonessential amino acid found in many proteins in the body. It is metabolized in the liver to produce pyruvate and glutamate.

alanine

a naturally occurring, nonessential amino acid.

alanine cycle
cycle of alanine produced in muscle from transamination of pyruvate produced from glycolysis of glucose during exercise, transported in the plasma to the liver where the alanine amino-nitrogen is converted to urea for excretion and the carbon from the keto-acid of alanine, pyruvate, is recycled via gluconeogenesis to glucose, which is finally transported back to the muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alanine pellet dosimeters were measured with a Bruker Biospin ECS106 EPR spectrometer.
Importantly, O'Brien's group found that alanine was uncorrelated with other foods that can contribute to elevated carbon ratios.
8 [micro]mol/l while alanine used as the internal standard was in the range of 301 -553 [micro]mol/l.
The second experiment was carried out to evaluate the metabolic adaptations to chronic sulphide exposure for 10 days by measuring PK and PEPCK enzyme activities, succinate and alanine content, the adenylate energy charge (AEC), and the activity of the electron transport system (ETS) in whole oysters at above 20 [micro]M.
Replacing a single amino acid with either alanine or arginine, or adding alanine or arginine to the amino acid sequence, significantly improved the sweetness profiles of the variants.
Serine, glycine and alanine work with Joico's exclusive traimine complex to reconstruct the hair from the inside out.
By day 4 of hospitalization, the patient's level of creatine phosphokinase had elevated to 146 266 U/L, the level of aspartate aminotransferase was 3082 U/L, the level of alanine aminotransferase was 1144 U/L, and the level of lactate dehydrogenase was 4687 U/L.
2 mg/dL, serum alanine aminotransferase level 63 IU/L, and serum aspartate aminotransferase level 56 IU/L.
The drug has proven an effective inhibitor of virus replication and has indicated improvements in the increase of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and overall liver health.
Tokyo, Japan) has patented transgenic plants containing free amino acids, particularly at least one amino acid selected from among glutamic acid, asparagine, aspartic acid, serine, threonine, alanine and histidine accumulated in a large amount, in edible parts thereof, and a method of producing them.
Other endpoints observed in the study were a 57 percent increase in liver glycogen and no changes in muscle glycogen or in levels of plasma insulin or alanine aminotransferase.
These are valine (V) or alanine (A) at codon 13 6, arginine (R) or histidine (H) at codon 154, and glutamine (Q), arginine (R), or histidine (H) at codon 171.