akinetic mutism


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Related to akinetic mutism: hemiballismus, Locked in Syndrome

mutism

 [mu´tizm]
inability or refusal to speak, most often because deafness has prevented the person from hearing the spoken word. speech is learned by imitating the speech of others. The child who is born with normal hearing and then loses it may lose part or all of the power of speech through loss of contact with the speech of others. Mutism may also occur because the voice organs themselves have been damaged or removed, such as when a laryngectomy is performed for throat cancer. In other cases loss of speech may be psychogenic in nature. Called also aphonia.
akinetic mutism a state in which the person makes no spontaneous movement or vocal sound, because of either neurologic or psychologic reasons. Called also abulia.
selective mutism a mental disorder of childhood characterized by continuous refusal to speak in social situations when the child is able and willing to speak to selected persons.

a·ki·net·ic mut·ism

a persistent state of altered consciousness, in which the patient appears alert intermittently (that is, demonstrates a sleep-wake cycle) but is not responsive, although the descending motor pathways appear intact; caused by lesions of various cerebral structures.
Synonym(s): coma vigil

akinetic mutism

A state of apparent alertness with following eye movements but no speech or voluntary motor responses.

a·ki·net·ic mut·ism

(ā'ki-net'ik myū'tizm)
Subacute or chronic state of altered consciousness, in which the patient appears alert intermittently but is not responsive, although the descending motor pathways appear intact; due to lesions of various cerebral structures.

a·ki·net·ic mut·ism

(ā'ki-net'ik myū'tizm)
Persistent state of intermittently alert altered consciousness, caused by lesions of various cerebral structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
BIPLEDs in akinetic mutism caused by bilateral anterior cerebral artery infarction.
Akinetic mutism cases due to bilateral anterior cerebral artery infarct.
Quinn, "Telephone effect in akinetic mutism from traumatic brain injury," Psychosomatics, vol.
Diagnoses Key finding to rule out considered Disorder of Assessment revealing x consciousness patient wakefulness and ability to communicate via eye gaze [down arrow] Upper cervical Observation of normal, x spinal quiet respiration and cord injury impairment of supraspinal muscles [down arrow] Akinetic mutism Lack of automatic x protective extension/ equilibrium reactions and no withdrawal to pain [down arrow] Locked-in Primary suspected [check] syndrome diagnosis by exclusion of other likely diagnoses Table 4: Primary classifications for disorders of consciousness.
Table Red flags for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in psychiatric patients Dementia (sudden onset, rapidly progressive) Myoclonus Akinetic mutism Visual symptoms (ie, cortical blindness) Cerebellar symptoms Extrapyramidal symptoms Sleep disturbances Chorea
([double dagger]) Disease duration, the duration from onset to akinetic mutism state or death if the patients never displayed akinetic mutism.
Some patients with akinetic mutism, for example, can vocalize and perform simple motor activities.
Figure Severity of impairment in goal-directed activity in disorders of diminished motivation LEAST Apathy * Noticeable lack of motivation that varies from baseline * Reduced goal-directed behaviors or cognition Abulia * More apparent decrease in spontaneous, purposeful movement * Less severe impairment than akinetic mutism GREATEST Akinetic mutism Akinetic = no movement Mutism = no speech * Patient is alert with visual tracking intact but appears immobilized due to motivational deficit Source: References 1-3 On hospital day 2, Ms.
Akinetic mutism secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage
DPHL can be divided into 2 clinical variations: parkinsonism and akinetic mutism. The former consists of conventional parkinsonian features along with agitation, apathy, hallucinations, dystonic posturing, and odd behaviors.
Masters proposed that probable CJD may be diagnosed in patients with rapidly progressive dementia, biphasic or triphasic waves on EEG, and at least two of myoclonus, visual or cerebellar symptoms, pyramidal or extrapyramidal signs, and akinetic mutism (14).
CJD is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive changes, behavioral changes, gait disturbances, akinetic mutism, and myoclonus.