akinesia


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akinesia

 [a″ki-ne´zhah]
1. absence or loss of the power of voluntary movement.
2. the temporary paralysis of a muscle by the injection of procaine.
akinesia al´gera a condition characterized by generalized pain associated with movement of any kind.

a·ki·ne·si·a

(ā-ki-nē'sē-ă, ā-kī-),
1. Absence or loss of the power of voluntary movement, due to an extrapyramidal disorder.
2. Obsolete term denoting the postsystolic interval of rest of the heart.
3. Absence of either inward or outward (dyskinesia) movement of a ventricular region during systole.
4. A neurosis accompanied by paretic symptoms.
Synonym(s): akinesis
[G. a- priv. + kinēsis, movement]

akinesia

/aki·ne·sia/ (a″kĭ-ne´zhah) absence, poverty, or loss of control of voluntary muscle movements.
akinesia al´gera  a condition characterized by generalized pain associated with movement of any kind.

akinesia

(ā′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
Loss of normal motor function, resulting in impaired muscle movement.

a′ki·net′ic (-nĕt′ĭk) adj.

akinesia

[ā′kinē′zhə, ā′kīnē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, a, kinesis, without movement
an abnormal state of motor and psychic hypoactivity. Also called akinesis. akinetic, adj.

akinesia

Neurology Absent or decreased voluntary movement.
Pharmacology Temporary paralysis of a muscle by procaine injection.
Psychiatry Hysterical paralysis, see there.

akinesia

Neurology Absent or ↓ voluntary movement Pharmacology Temporary paralysis of a muscle by procaine injection Psychiatry Hysterical paralysis, see there.

a·ki·ne·si·a

(ā'ki-nē'sē-ă)
Absence or loss of the power of voluntary movement due to an extrapyramidal disorder.
[G. a- priv. + kinēsis, movement]

akinesia

Loss of the power of voluntary movement. Paralysis of the motor function.

Akinesia

A loss of the ability to move; freezing in place.
Mentioned in: Parkinson Disease

a·ki·ne·si·a

, akinesis (ā'ki-nē'sē-ă, -nē'sis)
Absence or loss of the power of voluntary movement, due to an extrapyramidal disorder.
[G. a- priv. + kinēsis, movement]

akinesia (ā´kənē´zhə),

n a loss of controllable motion and feelings of exhaustion. It is a common consequence of Parkinson's disease, causing dopamine loss in the direct pathway of movement.

akinesia

1. abnormal absence or poverty of movements.
2. the temporary paralysis of a muscle by the injection of a local anesthetic agent.

eyelid akinesia
produced by performing an auriculopalpebral nerve block.
References in periodicals archive ?
mice, alteration of the akinesia temporal duration was not seen throughout 'gp' (Figure 1C).
2012b) documented multiple motor abnormalities on average 6-8 years prior to PD diagnosis, including voice and face akinesia, rigidity, abnormal gait, limb bradykinesia.
Physical signs: early primitive reflexes and incontinence; late akinesia, rigidity and tremor.
These include a number of muscular side effects known as extra-pyramidal reactions: dystonia (muscle spasms, particularly in the face and arms, irregular flexing, writhing or grimacing and protrusion of the tongue); akathesia (internal restlessness or agitation, an inability to sit still); akinesia (physical immobility and lack of spontaneity); and Parkinsonisms (mask-like facial expression, drooling, muscle stiffness, tremors, shuffling gait).
Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed akinesia of the anterior, septal and apical segments with apical thrombus (1.
Clinically PD is characterised by rigidity, tremor (cogwheel, lead pipe, and resting), akinesia, bradykinesia (poverty and slowness of movement), and postural instability (leading to frequent falls).
This is illustrated by Parkinson's disease, whose symptoms -- akinesia and other movement disorders -- can be traced back to a lack of dopamine.
Antipsychotic medications can cause a variety of effects on the nervous system, including parkinsonism, akinesia (a state of reduced spontaneous mobility combined with extreme apathy), and akathisia (a state of constant agitation and involuntary movement).
14,15) In some studies, inclusion of hyaluronidase increases globe and lid akinesia, which may improve the safety of the procedure.