akathisia


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Related to akathisia: pseudoparkinsonism

akathisia

 [ak″ah-thĭ´zhah]
a condition of motor restlessness in which there is a feeling of muscular quivering, an urge to move about constantly, and an inability to sit still, a common side effect of neuroleptic drugs.

a·ka·thi·si·a

(ak-ă-thiz'ē-ă),
A syndrome characterized by an inability to remain seated, with motor restlessness and a feeling of muscular quivering; may appear as a side effect of antipsychotic and neuroleptic medication.
Synonym(s): acathisia
[G. a- priv. + kathisis, a sitting]

akathisia

/ak·a·this·ia/ (ak″ah-thĭ´zhah) a condition marked by motor restlessness, ranging from anxiety to inability to lie or sit quietly or to sleep, a common extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptic drugs.

akathisia

[ak′əthē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, a + kathizein, not to sit
a pathological condition characterized by restlessness and agitation, such as an inability to sit still. akathisiac, adj.

akathisia

(1) Restless leg syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (jimmy legs).
(2) Motor restlessness ranging from a sense of inner restlessness to inability to sit or lie still, fidgeting, rocking from foot to foot and pacing, accompanied by a sensation of muscular quivering and an urge to stay in constant motion.

Aetiology
Akathisia is a common extrapyramidal effect of neuroleptic and antipsychotic drug therapy. Symptoms can develop within a few weeks of starting or raising the dose of traditional neuroleptic medications or of reducing the dose of drugs used to treat extrapyramidal symptoms.

akathisia

Antsiness Neurology Motor restlessness ranging from a feeling of inner disquiet to inability to sit still or lie quietly, accompanied by a sensation of muscular quivering, and an urge to be in constant motion, a common extrapyramidal effect of neuroleptics/antipsychotics. See Extrapyramidal syndrome.

a·ka·thi·sia

(ak-ă-thiz'ē-ă)
A syndrome characterized by an inability to remain in a sitting posture, with motor restlessness and a feeling of muscular quivering; may appear as a side effect of antipsychotic and neuroleptic medication.
[G. a- priv. + kathisis, a sitting]

akathisia

The inability to sit quietly because of uncontrollable movements caused by drugs, especially the phenothiazine derivatives (see PHENOTHIAZINE DRUGS) used to treat mental disorders.

Akathisia

Agitated or restless movement, usually affecting the legs and accompanied by a sense of discomfort. It is a common side effect of neuroleptic medications.
Mentioned in: Schizophrenia
References in periodicals archive ?
The prescribing information on antidepressants specifically warns that patients should be monitored for symptoms like anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, mania and akathisia.
Current smokers displayed significantly less Parkinsonism (Lower Simpson-Angus Scale scores) but higher levels of akathisia (higher Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale Scores).
Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence [greater than or equal to] 5% and at least twice the rate of placebo) in patients treated with LATUDA were somnolence, akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms, and nausea.
17] The common side effects of perospirone include akathisia, tremor, muscle rigidity, insomnia, drowsiness and other neuropsychiatric symptoms.
Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence > 5% and at least twice the rate of placebo) in patients treated with LATU DA were somnolence, akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms, and nausea.
For example, Saphris dosed at 20 mg per day yields an NNH of 13 for the side effect akathisia (restlessness).
When the akathisia that it caused was at its worst, Cory said that if he had been handed a gun, he surely would have shot himself.
There are high possibilities that some patients with schizophrenia presenting with depressive symptoms may in fact be having anti-psychotic-induced dysphoria, without the associated motor aspects of akathisia that make diagnosis more obvious (22).
Four of these side effects--extrapyramidal disorder, somnolence, akathisia, and salivary hypersecretion--were possibly related to the dose, as they were more common after 4 weeks of treatment among those on the 30-mg dose and were lowest among those on placebo, according to BMS and Otsuka.