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AIR


air

(ār),
1. A mixture of odorless gases found in the atmosphere in the following approximate percentages by volume after water vapor has been removed: oxygen, 20.95; nitrogen, 78.08; argon 0.93; carbon dioxide, 0.03; other gases, 0.01. Formerly used to mean any respiratory gas, regardless of its composition.
2. Synonym(s): ventilate
[G. aēr; L. aer]

air

(ār) the gaseous mixture which makes up the atmosphere.
alveolar air  see under gas.
residual air  see under volume.
tidal air  see under volume.

air

Etymology: Gk, aer
the colorless, odorless gaseous mixture constituting the earth's atmosphere. It consists of 78% nitrogen; 20% oxygen; almost 1% argon; small amounts of carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and ozone; traces of helium, krypton, neon, and xenon; and varying amounts of water vapor.

AIR

Aerosolised Iloprost Randomised Study. A trial comparing functional changes caused by iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analogue, to placebo in patients with pulmonary hypertension.
Primary endpoint 10% increase in 6-minute walking distance and an improvement in the NYHA functional class.
Conclusion Iloprost was better than placebo. Combined clinical endpoint was met by 17% vs. 5% in the placebo group, distance walked in 6 minutes was 36 meters greater, functional class improved, dyspnoea decreased, quality of life increased, and fewer treated patients died or deteriorated. Syncope was similar in both groups.
Adverse events Tolerable flushing and jaw pain.

AIR

Abbreviation for 5-aminoimidazole ribose 5-phosphate; 5-aminoimidazole ribotide.

air

(ār)
1. A mixture of odorless gases found in the atmosphere in the following approximate percentages: oxygen, 20.95; nitrogen, 78.08; argon 0.93; carbon dioxide, 0.03; other gases, 0.01.
2. Synonym(s): ventilate.
[G. aēr; L. aer]

air

The mixture of gases forming the atmosphere of the earth. It consists of about 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 0.1% argon, 0.03% carbon dioxide and smaller proportions of rare gases and ozone. A continuing adequate supply of oxygen is essential to life.

air

(ār)
1. A mixture of odorless gases found in the atmosphere in the following approximate percentages by volume after water vapor has been removed: oxygen, 20.95; nitrogen, 78.08; argon 0.93; carbon dioxide, 0.03; other gases, 0.01. Formerly used to mean any respiratory gas, regardless of its composition.
2. Synonym(s): ventilate.
[G. aēr; L. aer]

air,

n the invisible, odorless, gaseous mixture that makes up the earth's atmosphere.
air, ambient,
n the encircling or enveloping environment; surrounding air.
air chamber,
air, complemental,
air, functional residual,
air, minimal,
n the volume of air in the air sacs themselves (part of the residual air).
air reserve,
air, residual,
air, supplemental,
air syringe,
air, tidal,
air turbine handpiece,
n See handpiece, air turbine.

air

the gaseous mixture that makes up the atmosphere. See also air sacs.

air capillaries
the minuscule vessels that connect the parabronchi in avian lungs, in which there are no blind-ended tubules.
air cell
the air-filled space between the internal and external shell membranes of a bird's egg.
air changes per hour
the standard measurements used to indicate the level of ventilation in a building especially with respect to removal of humidity, noxious gases and carbon dioxide.
air dried
said of feed that is dried in the open with only natural movement of air, e.g. conventional hay. Contains about 10% water.
air filtration
used as a means of reducing contamination inside a building, the efficiency depending on the pore size of the filter. A technique of some value when combined with temperature control in reducing the prevalence of pneumonia in calves in intensive veal producing units.
air flow rates
are important in assessing the suitability of a ventilating system in animal accommodation. Standards for suitable flow rates for different species and age groups for heating and cooling are available.
air gap technique
in radiography, a technique to reduce scatter of radiation by increasing the distance between the patient and the surface of the cassette.
air hunger
a distressing dyspnea affecting both inspiration and expiration which occurs in paroxysms; characteristic of diabetic acidosis and coma. Called also Kussmaul's respiration.
air movement
includes air changes voiding humidity and gases to the exterior plus movements within the space which facilitate cooling.
air passages
the combined air delivery system of the upper and lower respiratory tracts including nasal cavities, pharynx, laryngeal cavity, trachea, bronchi and bronchioles.
air pollution
contamination of the air with deleterious or esthetically unattractive chemical, physical or biological material. Usually reserved for pollutants generated by humans.
air pump
a small electrically driven appliance used to provide a constant stream of air bubbles to aquaria. The bubbles themselves add little oxygen to the water but the constant disturbance of the surface of the water does.
air quality
the determination of air flow rate, temperature, humidity, freedom from bacteria, solid particles, obnoxious effluvia and poisonous gases—especially hydrogen sulfide and methane from sullage pits under the animal accommodation.
air trapping
dilatation of alveoli without destruction of their walls.
air vesicles
extend radially from parabronchi in the lungs of birds and connect with air capillaries, in which gaseous exchange occurs with vascular capillaries.

Patient discussion about air

Q. Are superbugs contagious through the air? Last week we visited my dad in the hospital, and we noticed that on the next room’s door there was a warning sign. After asking, we were told it was a denoting that the patient inside had a superbug (called klebsiella). On our way out we passed against this patient in the hallway – is it possible that I also carry this superbag? Is it dangerous?

A. Usually these bacteria are transmitted from person to person through direct contact, and less through the air. Moreover, these germs are dangerous in ill and debilitated patients, and not in normal healthy individuals.

Q. breating air that has tetrachloroethene in it how does it affect you if u have prostate cancer the air in my building has been determined to have Tetrachloroethylene in it i have just been diagnosed with prostate cancer

A. i found a research they did in Finland about tetrachloroethene, and they saw that amongst the people who were exposed to it over the years there was an increased amount of cancerous events. and even prostate cancer.

here is a link to the abstract-

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7552463?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

Q. where would i find list of all the "clean" cities and the rates of air pollution ...?

A. i don't know about a list of "good" cities, but i know a list of the worse cities for Asthmatic people!-
http://www.webmd.com/asthma/news/20050215/americas-worst-asthma-cities

More discussions about air
References in periodicals archive ?
The airships will transport personnel, critical supplies for mine operations, and carry more than 200,000 tonnes of rare earth ore concentrate annually for delivery to Quests Bcancour refining facilities.
In due course, major haulage contractors may find it attractive to invest in airships as an alternative to lorries for transporting heavy and bulky goods.
Straightline Aviation (SLA) intends to buy up to 12 Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) Hybrid Airships with a potential value of approximately USD480 million, the company said.
The design of the airships puts them at 280 feet long and capable of carrying 47,000 pounds of cargo, and Straightline plans to use them for running operations for oil and gas companies - which often operate in remote locations with irregular terrain - to transport their commodities and machinery, according to the Wall Street Journal.
The University of Lincoln team's research has focused on how to make the most efficient use of energy generated by the photovoltaic cells on the airships and its subsequent use in the electrical power systems, energy storage and the propulsive power requirements.
On June 29, 1919, Z35 broke the endurance record for an airship through a flight which encompassed Scotland.
Stratxx is proud to that this is the first time a tethered airship has been used successfully in a broadcasting capacity at altitude.
Originally slated for service in Afghanistan, some technical glitches ultimately played the deciding factor in its demise, as the airship wasn't performance-ready for deployment.
Even though airships are currently demonstrating military utility and value in a number of applications, including intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, border patrol, and communications platforms, considerable resistance is still encountered when the use of a hybrid airship for military lift is proposed.
Barry Prentice really, really wants to fly his airship.
I asked myself, "if someone handed me an airship and told me to employ it, how would it be useful?