airborne radioactivity

airborne radioactivity

A general term for particulate or gaseous radioactive material that is dissolved, mixed, or otherwise suspended in air.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Materials related to "Air Attack: A Danger to Our Cultural Heritage," a 1989 exhibition in Trondheim about the effects of acid rain and the spread of airborne radioactivity after the Chernobyl disaster--erroneously blamed for destroying the facade of the city's Nidaros Cathedral--were displayed in glass vitrines to reconstruct the indelible impression it made on the young artist.
Six airborne radioactivity sources are considered (taking HTR-PM, as instance, shown in Figure 6) and calculated individually in NORMAL, including
Desorption of parts of absorbed radioactive nuclides in this process makes them contribute to airborne radioactivity, too.
The amount of airborne radioactivity leaked from the secondary loop steam is related to the concentration of tritium in the secondary loop and the operating status of the turbine.
The high-pressure helium with radioactive materials discharged into the containment vessel through a primary circuit break will cause a pressure increase and then trigger rupture discs so that airborne radioactivity would release to the environment.
It supposes that a 65 mm diameter pipe break causes the accident, and then the airborne radioactivity releases to the environment.
Seoul officials say the North is expected to detonate a nuclear device made of highly enriched uranium, which is difficult to immediately detect with available techniques, including airborne radioactivity, seismological and airborne sound wave tests.
It reduces the airborne radioactivity within the building many thousand-fold.
The Sasebo city government said airborne radioactivity monitoring posts did not record any unusual figures during the nuclear carrier's stay.
During question time, a Loretto Express traveler said that many New Mexico residents had been contaminated from airborne radioactivity resulting from the extensive forest fires in and around the Los Alamos nuclear facility.
Critics are concerned with the amount of radioactive waste WIPP will store, the lack of a leak-proof containment system, the unstable and brine-infested geology of the site, the potential for plutonium to leak into a nearby river, and the threat of airborne radioactivity. Reade claims that "the site is not safe, and can never be made safe."'

Full browser ?