air-fluidized bed


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Related to air-fluidized bed: Clinitron bed

air-flu·i·dized bed

(ār-flū'i-dīzd bed)
Type of bed intended to promote skin integrity and prevent skin breakdown. Within the mattress, small ceramic spheres are constantly blown by temperature-controlled airflow to distribute the patient's weight evenly, keeping pressure off bony prominences.

air-fluidized bed

A bed consisting of a mattress filled with tiny glass or ceramic spheres that are suspended by a continuous flow of warm air. The patient “floats” on the mattress with only minimal penetration. Because of the even distribution of weight, the bed is particularly useful in treating or preventing pressure sores.
See also: bed
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Patients were followed for a 36-week period and divided into the following groups: (1) patients who completed the 36-week home care regimen; (2) patients who died during the study; (3) "completely dropped" patients, ie, those who did not follow the prescribed home care and data reporting regimen or, in one case, died before the air-fluidized bed was installed; and (4) "partially dropped" patients, ie, patients how enrolled in the study and followed the study protocol for only part of the 36-week study period.
The model also assumed a charge of $70 for each day a patient was receiving air-fluidized bed therapy.
It was assumed that Medicare would also pay for 80% of the $70-per-day charge for air-fluidized bed therapy.
The air-fluidized bed therapy group (n = 58) and the control group (n = 54) were very similar with regard to age, sex, education, principal payer, type of home support, reasons for immobility, and continence (Table 1); no differences were statistically significant.
Excluding patients in the "completely dropped" category, there were 47 patients in the group that received air-fluidized bed therapy and 50 patients in the control group who were receiving conventional therapy.
Air-fluidized bed therapy patients used the bed for an average of 116 days, or for 56% of the average available time (Table 3).