air pollution


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Related to air pollution: noise pollution, water pollution

air pol·lu·tion

contamination of air by smoke and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, or burning rubbish.
See also: smog.

air pollution

Etymology: L, polluere, to defile
contamination of the air by noxious fumes, aromas, or toxic chemicals.

air pollution

The presence in the air of substances suh as carbon monoxide (CO), NO2, ozone, particulate matter, and SO2, which are byproducts of human activities, and which have an adverse effect on health. Fine (diameter ≤2.5 µm) particles are derived primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels in transportation, manufacturing, and power generation, and are mixed with soot, acid condensates, nitrate and sulfate particles, and may pose a greater risk to health as they are generally more toxic and can be inhaled deeply into the lungs; there is a significant association between fine particulate air pollution and deaths from cardiopulmonary disease, lung cancer, and other causes.
Health effects of air pollution Respiratory complaints, restricted activity, chest discomfort, sore throats, eye irritation; CO and ozone are linked to heart malformations and heart valve defects.

air pol·lu·tion

(ār pŏ-lū'shŭn)
Contamination of air by smoke, particulate matter, and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, and burning rubbish.
See also: smog

air pollution

the presence of contaminants in the form of dust, fumes, gases or other chemicals in the atmosphere in quantities which adversely affect living organisms. See ACID RAIN.

air

the gaseous mixture that makes up the atmosphere. See also air sacs.

air capillaries
the minuscule vessels that connect the parabronchi in avian lungs, in which there are no blind-ended tubules.
air cell
the air-filled space between the internal and external shell membranes of a bird's egg.
air changes per hour
the standard measurements used to indicate the level of ventilation in a building especially with respect to removal of humidity, noxious gases and carbon dioxide.
air dried
said of feed that is dried in the open with only natural movement of air, e.g. conventional hay. Contains about 10% water.
air filtration
used as a means of reducing contamination inside a building, the efficiency depending on the pore size of the filter. A technique of some value when combined with temperature control in reducing the prevalence of pneumonia in calves in intensive veal producing units.
air flow rates
are important in assessing the suitability of a ventilating system in animal accommodation. Standards for suitable flow rates for different species and age groups for heating and cooling are available.
air gap technique
in radiography, a technique to reduce scatter of radiation by increasing the distance between the patient and the surface of the cassette.
air hunger
a distressing dyspnea affecting both inspiration and expiration which occurs in paroxysms; characteristic of diabetic acidosis and coma. Called also Kussmaul's respiration.
air movement
includes air changes voiding humidity and gases to the exterior plus movements within the space which facilitate cooling.
air passages
the combined air delivery system of the upper and lower respiratory tracts including nasal cavities, pharynx, laryngeal cavity, trachea, bronchi and bronchioles.
air pollution
contamination of the air with deleterious or esthetically unattractive chemical, physical or biological material. Usually reserved for pollutants generated by humans.
air pump
a small electrically driven appliance used to provide a constant stream of air bubbles to aquaria. The bubbles themselves add little oxygen to the water but the constant disturbance of the surface of the water does.
air quality
the determination of air flow rate, temperature, humidity, freedom from bacteria, solid particles, obnoxious effluvia and poisonous gases—especially hydrogen sulfide and methane from sullage pits under the animal accommodation.
air trapping
dilatation of alveoli without destruction of their walls.
air vesicles
extend radially from parabronchi in the lungs of birds and connect with air capillaries, in which gaseous exchange occurs with vascular capillaries.

Patient discussion about air pollution

Q. where would i find list of all the "clean" cities and the rates of air pollution ...?

A. i don't know about a list of "good" cities, but i know a list of the worse cities for Asthmatic people!-
http://www.webmd.com/asthma/news/20050215/americas-worst-asthma-cities

More discussions about air pollution
References in periodicals archive ?
HELP BRITAIN BREATHE CAMPAIGN THE Healthy Air Campaign (HAC) has launched the Help Britain Breathe initiative to help raise awareness of UK air pollution, and Andrea Lee of HAC says: "People living in UK towns and cities are unaware of how they and their families are affected by the dirty air they breathe every day.
The most vulnerable to illnesses caused by air pollution are children living in poverty, who tend to have poorer health and little access to health services.
Also, providing children with access to good quality healthcare is a major part of protecting them from air pollution, and treatment and prevention programmes for pneumonia, as well as other respiratory conditions, can significantly reduce the chance a child falls sick or dies.
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda, adopted at a UN summit last year, call for substantially reducing the number of deaths and illnesses from air pollution.
The primary mechanism of air pollution involves formation of VOC, biological generation of VOC, formation of liquid aerosol droplets, anthropomorphic generation of particulate aersols, biological generation of aerosol, particulate aersol formation.
There is a two way interaction between air pollution and cardiovascular risk factors, state the authors.
Thus, for all intents and purposes, the health impact of Bowen's air pollution is invisible to the residents of Cartersville--and to everyone else.
If you're worried about air pollution in your home or office, you're right to be very concerned.
The question of whether air pollution quietly kills millions of people has to be decided by examining the evidence, not by checking that claim against one's political principles, be they environmentalist, pro-market, or something else.
One groundbreaking international study was the subject of two important articles: "Hidden Health Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation" published in Science, volume 293, in August 2001, and "Assessing the Health Benefits of Urban Air Pollution Reductions Associated with Climate Change Mitigation (2000-2020)" published in Environmental Health Perspectives, volume 109, in June 2001.
Children are more sensitive than adults are to air pollution; they spend more time outside engaged in vigorous activity, are exposed to air pollution for a longer duration, have a higher breathing rate relative to body weight, and have smaller airways.
E: From your research, what role does air pollution play in the onset of cancer?