air bronchogram


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air bron·cho·gram

radiographic appearance of an air-filled bronchus surrounded by fluid-filled airspaces.

air bron·cho·gram

(ār brong'kō-gram)
Radiographic appearance of an air-filled bronchus surrounded by fluid-filled airspaces.
References in periodicals archive ?
A chest CT scan revealed extension of the consolidation areas with air bronchogram in the left upper lobe and opacities in the right lung (Figure 3).
The most common combination of findings in primary and secondary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma included consolidation with air bronchogram, ground-glass opacities, and lymphadenopathy.
On clinical examination, RR > 60/min for > 2 hours, grunting, flaring of nasal alae, subcostal, intercostals retractions, diffuse reticulogranular pattern and air bronchogram on X-ray chest, arterial blood gas done whenever necessary was done and all preterms < 37 wks.
In real time, air can be seen moving through the bronchi, and this finding is known as a dynamic air bronchogram. The sensitivity of B-mode ultrasound imaging is approximately 90%.
During the initial assessment, laboratories tests were requested and the results showed eight times, from its normal value, elevated transaminases, hyperbilirubinemia at the expense of direct, hyperlactatemia and impaired renal function; his chest radiography has an increased heart silhouette; also, retrocardial opacity was observed without the air bronchogram (Figure 1).
Note consolidation with air bronchogram in lingula (black arrow) and air-fluid containing cavity in right lower lobe (thick black arrow) adjacent to pleural effusion (thick white arrow).
An air bronchogram over the retrocardiac region was noted on chest radiography and pneumonia was suspected.
Chest X-rays of BALTOMA patients are usually nondiagnostic: solitary nodules (23%), multiple nodules (32%), air-space consolidation with air bronchogram (18%), patchy air-space and/or interstitial infiltrate (23%), peribronchial thickening (9%), hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy (5%), and pleural effusion (9%) were reported [4, 7].
The radiological evidence is the pulmonary edema with interstitial opacity, consolidations, air bronchogram, and Kerley's "B" lines.[8] The prognosis may vary from spontaneous resolution to life-threatening respiratory failure.
Chest radiographs showed a severe bilateral air bronchogram in the lung field.
When alveolar injury is moderate to severe, it is seen as poorly defined areas of consolidation, with no air bronchogram sign, as a result of bronchial obstruction caused by secretions and/or blood.