agrimony


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agrimony

an herb found in Asia, Europe, and the United States.
uses Agrimony is used for mild diarrhea, gastroenteritis, intestinal secretion of mucus, inflammation of the mouth and throat, cuts and scrapes, and amenorrhea. There is insufficient reliable information to assess its effectiveness.
contraindications Agrimony is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to it or to roses.

Agrimony

An herb with a high content of tannin; it is anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, astringent, haemostatic, and is a GI tonic. It is used for athlete’s foot, diarrhoea, gastric ulcers, colitis, gallstones, cirrhosis, renal disease, and to decrease uric acid levels in gout.
Note: There are no peer-reviewed data regarding efficacy or safe or effective dose; its safety and efficacy in pregnancy is unknown. It can cause photodermatitis.

ag·ri·mo·ny

(ag'ri-mō-nē)
A perennial herb (Agrimonia eupatoria, A. herba) used in desiccated form in tablets and infusions, as well as topically (wound healing, astringent).
Synonym(s): cocklebur (1) , sticklewort.
[L. agrimonia, fr. G. argemōnē]

agrimony,

n Latin names:
Agrimonia eupatoria, Agrimonia pilosa var.,
Agrimonia japonica; parts used: stems, leaves, buds; uses: hemostatic, sore throat, cuts, abrasions, cancer, (other claims: antiasthmatic, antiinflammatory, sedative, decongestant, diuretic); precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, can cause flushing, palpitations, rash, photosensitivity, and photodermatitis. Also called
church steeples, cocklebur,
langyacao, liverwort, longyacao, philanthropos, potter's piletabs, sticklewort, or
stickwort.
Enlarge picture
Agrimony.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pick the leaves and flowers of hemp agrimony before the flowers open and harvest the roots of false indigo and coneflower in fall.
family Asteraceae) is an annual plant, 30-100 cm in height with yellow flowers (common names include threelobe beggarticks, water agrimony and Burr marigold).
As a result of this perpetual mowing, some plants have disappeared from this area including field scabious, quaking grass, yellow rattle and agrimony.
An herbalist/nutritional consultant from Boulder, Colorado presents general guidelines for the use of herbal medicines and profiles of some 180 herbs from agrimony to zedoary.
BARRINGTON COURT: The estate at the Tudorbuilt Barrington Court is excellent for late summer butterflies, which are attracted by the profusion of buddleias, Michaelmas daisies and Hemp Agrimony.
In Bach Flower Remedies for Animals, Helen Graham and Gregory Vlamis recommend walnut for eruptive conditions like hot spots and agrimony for anxiety that manifests in skin conditions.
Total Lift Minceur from Clarins claims to put a break on fat formation with plant extracts such as Peruvian creeper and to boost microcirculation with agrimony, all the while toning, firming, hydrating and nourishing the skin with phospholipids.
Or try the Bach Flower Remedies, Crab Apple and Agrimony - use a few drops of each under your tongue.
Drilling of the Agrimony and Pepperbush prospects is expected to commence in late December 2002 and January 2003.
It was a riot of colour full of humming bees and insects, now it's tidy but silent; all the fluffy pink agrimony has gone as have the Shasta daisies and the bindweed that clung to the railings like a drunk to a lamppost but at least they've left the beautiful buddleia and the strange spires of bear's breeches.