agraphia


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Related to agraphia: Finger agnosia

agraphia

 [a-graf´e-ah]
loss of ability to express thoughts in writing.

a·graph·i·a

(ă-graf'ē-ă),
Inability to write properly in the absence of abnormalities of the limb; often accompanies aphasia and alexia; caused by lesions in various portions of the cerebrum, especially those in or near the angular gyrus.
[G. a- priv. + graphō, to write]

agraphia

/agraph·ia/ (ah-graf´e-ah) impairment or loss of the ability to write.agraph´ic

agraphia

(ā-grăf′ē-ə)
n.
A disorder marked by loss of the ability to write.

a·graph′ic adj.

agraphia

[āgraf′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a + graphein, not to write
a loss of the ability to write, resulting from injury to the language center in the cerebral cortex. See also absolute agraphia. Compare dysgraphia. agraphic, adj.

agraphia

An acquired form of aphasia, which is characterised by the loss of a previously possessed ability to write.

Aetiology
Parietal lobe tumours involving the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
 
Clinical findings
Defects in fine motor skills, dexterity and muscle tone.

Management
Re-education, occupational therapy.

Agraphia

An acquired form of aphasia, which is characterised by a loss of a previously possessed ability to write.
Aetiology Parietal lobe tumours involving the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
Clinical findings Defects in fine motor skills, dexterity, muscle tone, and general clumsiness.
Management Re-education, occupational therapy.

agraphia

Neurology A form of aphasia, characterized by a loss in ability to write, which is most commonly seen in Pts with tumors of the parietal lobe which involve the dominant cerebral hemisphere.

a·graph·i·a

(ă-graf'ē-ă)
Inability to write properly in the absence of abnormalities of the limb; often accompanies aphasia and alexia; caused by lesions in various parts of the cerebrum.
Synonym(s): anorthography, logagraphia.
Compare: dysgraphia
[G. a- priv. + graphō, to write]

agraphia

Acquired inability to exercise the mental processes necessary for writing. There is no disorder of hand or eye function or coordination. In right-handed and many left-handed people, agraphia results from damage in the left parietal lobe of the brain, the part concerned with language.

agraphia 

Inability to write, usually as a result of a brain lesion. If the person can write from dictation but not from copying, it is called visual agraphia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Writing errors on paragraph level included paragraph agraphia and perseverative writing.
Besides, we found that error types such as totally no response, visuospatial impairment, paragraph agraphia, picture drawing, and perseverative writing were only seen in AD group, indicating that these error types may be characteristics of patients with AD.
In conclusion, this study confirmed that agraphia is an important feature in patients with AD.
A functional approach to the analysis of alexia without agraphia permitted us to establish precisely the conditions under which our patient's performance deteriorated.
Cuing and memory dysfunction in alexia without agraphia.
sup][1] found that agraphia tended to precede or occur independently from overt cognitive decline, rather than appear as a consequence of it.
Left frontotemporal lobe was supposed to be responsible for agraphia in Japanese patients.
The patients we have described herein represent a particular clinical form of MS characterized by impairment in cognitive functions rarely affected in this disease, such as aphasia, alexia, agraphia and visual agnosia.
Our first reported patient developed mild alexia with phonological agraphia in the context of a disease relapse, coincident with lesions in the left parietal and occipital areas, all evolving to complete remission at a later date.
Treatment of a case of phonological alexia with agraphia using the Auditory Discrimination in Depth (ADD) program.
The second neuropathological syndrome I wish to discuss is agraphia without alexia, or the inability to write while still being able to read.
This explains the agraphia without alexia in a way consistent with mindedness in a double brain.