agraphia


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Related to agraphia: Finger agnosia

agraphia

 [a-graf´e-ah]
loss of ability to express thoughts in writing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·graph·i·a

(ă-graf'ē-ă),
Inability to write properly in the absence of abnormalities of the limb; often accompanies aphasia and alexia; caused by lesions in various portions of the cerebrum, especially those in or near the angular gyrus.
[G. a- priv. + graphō, to write]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

agraphia

(ā-grăf′ē-ə)
n.
A disorder marked by loss of the ability to write.

a·graph′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

agraphia

An acquired form of aphasia, which is characterised by the loss of a previously possessed ability to write.

Aetiology
Parietal lobe tumours involving the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
 
Clinical findings
Defects in fine motor skills, dexterity and muscle tone.

Management
Re-education, occupational therapy.

Agraphia

An acquired form of aphasia, which is characterised by a loss of a previously possessed ability to write.
Aetiology Parietal lobe tumours involving the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
Clinical findings Defects in fine motor skills, dexterity, muscle tone, and general clumsiness.
Management Re-education, occupational therapy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

agraphia

Neurology A form of aphasia, characterized by a loss in ability to write, which is most commonly seen in Pts with tumors of the parietal lobe which involve the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

a·graph·i·a

(ă-graf'ē-ă)
Inability to write properly in the absence of abnormalities of the limb; often accompanies aphasia and alexia; caused by lesions in various parts of the cerebrum.
Synonym(s): anorthography, logagraphia.
Compare: dysgraphia
[G. a- priv. + graphō, to write]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

agraphia

Acquired inability to exercise the mental processes necessary for writing. There is no disorder of hand or eye function or coordination. In right-handed and many left-handed people, agraphia results from damage in the left parietal lobe of the brain, the part concerned with language.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

agraphia 

Inability to write, usually as a result of a brain lesion. If the person can write from dictation but not from copying, it is called visual agraphia.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
A severe alexia without agraphia and abnormalities in visual field significantly compromised the assessment of complex attention modalities, all reading modalities and comprehension of written text.
Alexia without agraphia in a child with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.
This case is reported due to the rare constellation of clinical syndromes: cardiac sarcoidosis as a possible etiology of left PCA stroke resulting in right hemianopia and alexia without agraphia. Cardiogenic stroke is a poorly understood manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis, and given the disabling nature of these sequelae, the importance of early diagnosis and prevention is crucial to prevent morbidity and mortality.
Writing errors on paragraph level included paragraph agraphia and perseverative writing.
As alexia sine agraphia is inherently suspenseful, it would seem to demand a suspenseful account by the writer suddenly afflicted by it--above all a crime writer used to dramatizing his plots.
As Abraham and Torok remark, inarticulateness and agraphia are often associated with incorporation, in which the lost object is not assimilated into the ego, mourned in language lamenting its disappearance, extolling its valued attributes.
Country Diary Drawings: 36 Drawings by Clifford Harper Agraphia Press, 78a Crofton Road, Camberwell, London SE5 8NA.
Lyman, Kwan, and Chao (1983) described a case where agraphia and alexia were more pronounced in the patient's first language, which was Chinese, rather than in his second language, English.
[1981]: 'Lexical or Orthographic Agraphia', Brain, 104, pp.
Agraphia or dysgraphia -- Similar to alexia, but involving writing.
The diagram in Figure 1 depicts this approach to the assessment of alexia without agraphia. We adapted and extended the testing paradigm used by Sidman (1971) to study equivalence relations associated with reading skills.
Agraphia has been reported to appear before frank dementia/aphasia,[sup][1] making it a potential clue to detect FTLD in the context of ALS.