agnostic

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agnostic

Neurology
adjective Suffering from agnosia.
 
Vox populi
noun A person who does not subscribe to a formal system of beliefs or religion.

agnostic

(ag-nos′tik) [G. agnōstos, unknown, not capable of being known + -ic]
Uncertain or doubtful of the ability to prove the existence of something, but esp. of God.
agnosticagnosticism (tĭ-sĭzm)
References in periodicals archive ?
Batchelor's so-called agnosticism is utterly paradoxical.
Their conversion to Christianity--or "reconversion" as Larsen terms it, since all had received some kind of Christian upbringing--was as carefully considered as the conversions of those such as Eliot to agnosticism.
A better one in terms of content would be "A Treatise on Agnosticism," although such a title would clearly be a harder sell.
The reasons why people profess to have no religious affiliation can be diverse, and include lack of interest, a commitment to free-thinking, agnosticism (being undecided), or simply not wishing to be labelled with any mainstream religion.
Moyers closes by wondering what those on the Christian right, who he "manipulated," now think of Rove confessing to a friend "his own agnosticism .
By the same token, there are many regular adherents who, if pressed, would admit to some considerable degree of agnosticism along with some doubts about the centrality of the Articles of Religion.
One of the strongest trends of the last hundred years must be, as in my own country, a strong growth of secularism and agnosticism.
However, as subsequent research produced new evidence that exit exams do not in fact increase dropout rates, the CEP moderated its stance to one of reasonable agnosticism.
But I have never heard of forced agnosticism or of a movement to teach atheism in our public schools.
Other religions, including but not limited to liberal Christianity, Reformed Judaism, most forms of Buddhism, Secular Humanism, Unitarianism, atheism, and agnosticism, are consistent with Darwinism and inconsistent with ID.
This foundational neutrality gives rise to Smith's attributions of "ontological agnosticism," "methodological modesty," and "theoretical economy.
In addition to questioning the effectiveness of helmet laws, motorcycle activists sometimes suggest (in an argument that belies their professed agnosticism on the question of whether it's smart to wear a helmet) that helmets make accidents more likely because they increase fatigue and impair hearing, peripheral vision, and awareness of air pressure changes.