aggravate

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aggravate

 [ag´rah-vāt″]
to cause a patient's condition to deteriorate.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was tried in district court and found guilty, and the judge found that the state had proven two grossly aggravating sentencing factors because Hughes had been driving while his license was revoked and had previously been convicted of DWI.
I appealed to the Supreme Court just to plead for a change of the charge from premeditated murder to stealing with aggravating circumstances,' Vuthy said.
One or more aggravating factors alleged by the State exist:
"The Bill provides for a higher maximum penalty where a person is convicted of the offence when an aggravating factor is present.
Similarly, all four aggravated murder charges involved the alleged killing of Gutierrez, but each alleges different aggravating factors.
THE standard punishment for using insulting language is a two-match ban but FA rules state that if there is an "aggravating factor" it should at least be doubled.
She claimed that the fall could have caused her death by aggravating an injury she already had.
A great example of what you can find when you are researching DUI using this list is the term "Aggravating factors": Aggravating factors are any set of factors that can increase or enhance DUI penalties for drivers who are arrested for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
In response, several states, including South Dakota, enacted revised death penalty statutes which contained aggravating circumstances to adhere to the mandate imposed by Furman.
Disqualified drivers who kill on the roads would face a jail term of between 36 weeks and two years, as would uninsured or unlicensed drivers whose actions lead to a fatality in cases where there are two or more aggravating factors.
Arizona, the Supreme Court held that a jury, not a judge, must find beyond a reasonable doubt any aggravating factors that are necessary in order for a defendant to be eligible for the death penalty.
Motorists were yesterday warned that the use of a mobile phone and falling asleep at the wheel would be regarded as 'aggravating' factors in determining the length of jail sentences in cases where driving has caused death.