agglutinogen

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agglutinogen

 [ag″loo-tin´o-jen]
a substance (antigen) that stimulates the animal body to form agglutinin (antibody).

ag·glu·tin·o·gen

(ă-glū-tin'ō-jen),
An antigenic substance that stimulates the formation of specific agglutinin, which can cause agglutination of cells that contain the antigen or particles coated with the antigen.
Synonym(s): agglutogen
[agglutinin + G. -gen, production]

agglutinogen

(ăg′lo͝o-tĭn′ə-jən, ə-glo͞ot′n-)
n.
An antigen that stimulates the production of a particular agglutinin, such as an antibody.

ag′glu·tin′o·gen′ic (ăg′lo͞o-tĭn′ə-gĕn′ĭk, ə-glo͞ot′n-) adj.

Agglutinogen

A nonspecific term of waning popularity for any substance that stimulates the formation of an agglutinin (antibody)—i.e., antigen.

ag·glu·tin·o·gen

(ă-glū-tin'ō-jen)
An antigenic substance that stimulates the formation of specific agglutinin, which, under certain conditions, causes agglutination of cells that contain the antigen or particles coated with the antigen.
Synonym(s): agglutogen.
[agglutinin + G. -gen, production]

agglutinogen

An ANTIGEN that stimulates the production of a substance that induces agglutination (an agglutinin).

agglutinogen

a surface antigen that induces the formation of agglutins in cells (including bacteria) and binds them to produce an AGGLUTINATION reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood Group Antigen Present (Agglutinogens) Group A A Group B B Group AB AB Group O Neither A nor B present The Rh (Rhesus) System (6-9) was first discovered in Rhesus Monkeys, hence it is called 'Rh' system.
These include: 1) tracheal cytotoxin that destroys cilia, making it difficult to clear thickened mucus; 2) pertussis toxin (also called lymphocytosis-promoting factor), which interferes with immune cell function, contributes to ciliary damage, and aids attachment to respiratory epithelium; 3) filamentous hemagglutinin, which helps the bacteria attach to cilia of the respiratory tract; 4) pertactin (also called 69 kilodalton protein), which also aids bacterial attachment to cilia; and 5) agglutinogens, which may aid persistent attachment to cilia.
Components of Bordetella pertussis that are important in the organism's ability to cause disease include: (1) tracheal cytotoxin that destroys cilia, making it difficult to clear thickened mucus; (2) pertussis toxin (also called lymphocytosis-promoting factor), which interferes with immune cell function, contributes to ciliary damage, and aids attachment to respiratory epithelium; (3) filamentous hemagglutinin, which helps the bacteria attach to cilia of the respiratory tract; (4) pertactin (also called 69 kilodalton protein), which also aids bacterial attachment to cilia; and (5) agglutinogens, which may aid persistent attachment to cilia.