agglutinogen


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agglutinogen

 [ag″loo-tin´o-jen]
a substance (antigen) that stimulates the animal body to form agglutinin (antibody).

ag·glu·tin·o·gen

(ă-glū-tin'ō-jen),
An antigenic substance that stimulates the formation of specific agglutinin, which can cause agglutination of cells that contain the antigen or particles coated with the antigen.
Synonym(s): agglutogen
[agglutinin + G. -gen, production]

agglutinogen

(ăg′lo͝o-tĭn′ə-jən, ə-glo͞ot′n-)
n.
An antigen that stimulates the production of a particular agglutinin, such as an antibody.

ag′glu·tin′o·gen′ic (ăg′lo͞o-tĭn′ə-gĕn′ĭk, ə-glo͞ot′n-) adj.

Agglutinogen

A nonspecific term of waning popularity for any substance that stimulates the formation of an agglutinin (antibody)—i.e., antigen.

ag·glu·tin·o·gen

(ă-glū-tin'ō-jen)
An antigenic substance that stimulates the formation of specific agglutinin, which, under certain conditions, causes agglutination of cells that contain the antigen or particles coated with the antigen.
Synonym(s): agglutogen.
[agglutinin + G. -gen, production]

agglutinogen

An ANTIGEN that stimulates the production of a substance that induces agglutination (an agglutinin).

agglutinogen

a surface antigen that induces the formation of agglutins in cells (including bacteria) and binds them to produce an AGGLUTINATION reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the Dutch whole-cell vaccine induces low levels of antibodies against pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin and high levels of antibodies to agglutinogens and pertactin (6).
Potential vaccine-target antigens important in disease production include (1) tracheal cytotoxin that destroys cilia, making it difficult to clear thickened mucus; (2) pertussis toxin (lymphocytosis-promoting factor), which interferes with immune-cell function, contributes to ciliary damage, and aids in attachment to respiratory epithelium; (3) filamentous hemagglutinin, which helps the bacteria attach to cilia of the respiratory tract; (4) pertactin (69-kd protein), which also enhances bacterial attachment to cilia; and (5) agglutinogens, which may aid persistent attachment to cilia.
The antigens that are involved in Blood Groups are called agglutinogens and the antibodies that are produced against these antigens are called agglutinins.
These include: 1) tracheal cytotoxin that destroys cilia, making it difficult to clear thickened mucus; 2) pertussis toxin (also called lymphocytosis-promoting factor), which interferes with immune cell function, contributes to ciliary damage, and aids attachment to respiratory epithelium; 3) filamentous hemagglutinin, which helps the bacteria attach to cilia of the respiratory tract; 4) pertactin (also called 69 kilodalton protein), which also aids bacterial attachment to cilia; and 5) agglutinogens, which may aid persistent attachment to cilia.