agglutinative


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Related to agglutinative: Agglutinative language

ag·glu·ti·na·tive

(ă-glū'ti-nă-tiv),
Causing, or able to cause, agglutination.

agglutinative

adjective
(1) Referring to aggregation.
(2) referring to agglutination.

ag·glu·ti·na·tive

(ă-glū'ti-nă-tiv)
Causing, or able to cause, agglutination.

agglutinative

(ă-gloot′ĭn-ā″tiv, -ă-tiv)
Causing or capable of causing agglutination.
References in periodicals archive ?
E-Hitz: A word-frequency list and a program for deriving psycholinguistic statistics in an agglutinative language (Basque).
The morphology of agglutinative languages is also finite, thought the number of possible word forms is much greater than in an inflective language.
However, despite the lack of agglutinative marking on Lao pronouns, they can generally remain unexpressed in any position, so the language is radical pro drop and consequently a counterexample to Neeleman and Szendroi's theory.
As cogently put by Ernest Gellner, contemporary man is modular, that is, is composed of bits and pieces that are agglutinative and can be supplemented, but also reshuffled, recombined, replaced and modified, as the circumstances may demand.
The Turkish sentence has an economy of words and an elegance which are due to the language being agglutinative, using participles, gerundives, and gerunds where an Indo-European language would use subjunctives and relative clauses.
Besides, he told himself, his true homeland was not Hungary but Hungarian, an agglutinative Finno-Ugrian language unrelated to the Indo-European family.
The literary correlate would be that in which one single term or its components (syllables) could be considered as an agglutinative of the theme or themes that make up an episode, a word that would provide a "minimalist" version (but an acceptably complete one), a word that would contain in itself the "quintessence" of the episode or its creative impulse.
Quechua--or, more properly, Runasimi, meaning literally "People Mouth"--is an agglutinative language, adding syllables onto a root to form long, meaningful words.
Yup'ik is an agglutinative language, in which base words change and become more subtle through the addition of postbases (or modifying suffixes), generally one or two, though half a dozen is not unusual.
Consider their language: Kurlansky mentions the fact that it is an agglutinative language, similar to Finnish and Hungarian, but he doesn't seem to be aware of the most recent determinations, namely, that Basque is a vestige of the language of the Aquitanian people, the last pre-Indo European language group to survive in the area extending from the Pyrcnecs to the Garonne and on down to present-day Navarre.
The agglutinative character of this language, rich in phrase-words, has undoubtedly reinforced, if not determined, the Indian genius for totality.
The nominal lexeme in both expressions is completely out of the phrase demonstrating the strict word order, another characteristic of agglutinative structure.