benign senescent forgetfulness

(redirected from age-related forgetfulness)

benign senescent forgetfulness

A mild memory defect which is generally regarded as a normal ageing phenomenon, which falls along a continuum from banal and expected to frank dementia.
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One says she just has normal age-related forgetfulness, while the other insists that she has advancing Alzheimer's disease.
There is also age-related forgetfulness we can all experience.
In addition to taking advantage of the tendency to focus more broadly to help circumvent age-related forgetfulness, Dr.
Lynn Hasher, senior scientist on the study and a leading authority in attention and inhibitory functioning in younger and older adults said "to eliminate age-related forgetfulness across three consecutive memory experiments and help older adults perform like younger adults is dramatic and to our knowledge a totally unique finding.".
"To eliminate age-related forgetfulness across three consecutive memory experiments and help older adults perform like younger adults is dramatic and to our knowledge a totally unique finding," said Lynn Hasher, senior scientist on the study and a leading authority in attention and inhibitory functioning in younger and older adults.
Two of these studies were human clinical trials done in Japan: the first administered 12 mg of natural astaxanthin to elderly subjects with age-related forgetfulness daily for 12 weeks to establish its efficacy in relation to age-related decline in both cognitive and psychomotor function.
Researchers aren't sure whether this age-related forgetfulness results from difficulty in creating memories, retrieving them, or both.
Trying to discern what is normal age-related forgetfulness versus something more serious is not always a black and white issue.
Dr Karin Yurko-Mauro, a researcher associated with the company, has revealed that taking a supplement of omega 3 for six months had a beneficial effect on people with age-related forgetfulness and loss of learning ability during the study.
Mood symptoms that accompany memory problems in older adults may be related to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a transitional stage between normal age-related forgetfulness and serious memory impairment.