age-based rationing

Age-Based Rationing

A proposed form of rationing publicly-funded health care services, in which limits would be placed on the type and amount of such services that would be freely available to persons above a certain age. Age-based rationing would affect women more because they live ±7.5 years more than men—for ages 85+, there are 45 men for every 100 women.

age-based rationing

Managed care, medical ethics A proposed form of rationing of publicly-funded health care services, in which limits would be placed on the type and amount of such services that would be freely available to persons above a certain age. See Rationing.
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Healthcare and other specialists also discuss physician Medicare fraud, continuous improvement in public reporting, what Canada can learn from the US experience in reducing healthcare-associated infections, applying the free market philosophy to healthcare, pharmaceutical supply chain management, primary care, hospice care, healthcare management, and age-based rationing.
Once we set such a limit and accept the "cultural shift" Callahan and Nuland call for, one that treats age-based rationing as morally justifiable, it is simple to show that, on average, those who are, say, 77 to 80, produce less and have greater care costs than those who are younger.
The possibility that using age-based rationing to ratchet down care will lead to troubling outcomes is far from mere speculation.
TO ARGUE AGAINST age-based rationing and the na vet of reallocation is not to suggest that the cost of Medicare--or, more precisely, of health care--should not be reduced.
Long before I met him, I was suspicious of the relatively crude position on age-based rationing attributed to him.
19) In further support of age-based rationing, proponents have proffered a wide gamut of benefits, including productivity, equality, natural life span, intergenerational justice and medical benefits.
Promoting age-based rationing is detrimental to the elderly in that it devalues the status of older people and caters to the values of a youth-oriented culture in which negative stereotyping based on age is prevalent.
For the USA to impose overt age-based rationing would only |tell aged persons that their lives are empty of meaning and worth', and leave them with |no purpose to their existence other than more of the same', thus making them even more likely to |cling desperately and selfishly to the la8t moments of life' (p.
23) Those who advocate age-based rationing do not generally propose to withhold all medical treatment from older persons, but rather, expensive, aggressive care.
Arguments in favor of age-based rationing are founded on more than economics.
Categorical approaches such as age-based rationing were rejected in favor of pragmatic case-oriented decisions that weigh societal cost against individual benefit.