agapism


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a·gap·ism

(ah'gahp-izm),
A doctrine exalting nonsexual love.
[G. agapē, brotherly love]

agapism

A philosophy of altruism, selflessness and brotherly fellowship (non-sexual love), first espoused by Henry Mayhew, a British social philospher in the 1850s; it was radopted 40 years later by an American philosopher, CS Peirce, and 60 years after that by the American hippie movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
An important argument is that, for him, signification is fulfilled with love, idea that follows the doctrine of agapism (evolution by the principle of love), and therefore, a person's learning should be the result of a free choice, as freedom is the main characteristic of love, and ultimately the true condition for growth.
Quotations such as the above, together with Nietzsche's skeptical writings regarding standard Judeo-Christian ethics, have led to the view among some of his readers that superior, powerful individuals can and should transcend agapism (i.
At stake in many of the essays is making a distinction between self-interested eudaimonism and self-sacrificing agapism to show how the former pales in comparison to the latter, in terms of moral cogency.
Chapter six discusses subjective theories of value, including emotivism and agapism.
Peirce coined the term agapism, alluding to the kind of love the New Testament God has toward his creatures, to capture the sense of design that emerges over the evolution of the universe but is not reducible to chance and/or necessity.
Hall's analysis, by delineating the continuity of personal identity, existential implications, moral implications, moral psychology, and the ethics and individualism of agapism, unequivocally established "the fundamental kinship between [Jonathan] Edwards and Bellamy" (29).
Consequently, Bellamy's agapism is less inclusive than Edwards's.