grain

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grain

 [grān]
1. a seed, especially of a cereal plant.
2. the smallest unit in the apothecaries' and avoirdupois systems, equal to 0.065 of a gram; abbreviated gr.

grain

(grān),
1. One of the cereal plants, or its seed.
2. A hard, minute particle of any substance, for example, sand.
3. A unit of weight equivalent to 0.064799 grain [For other equivalents, see appendix, Weights and Measures].
4. A macroscopically visible cluster of organisms living in tissue of patients with actinomycosis or mycetoma.
5. A particle of a silver halide in a photographic emulsion.
[L. granum]

grain (gr)

Etymology: L, granum, seed
the smallest unit of mass in avoirdupois, troy, and apothecaries' weights formerly based on the weight of a plump grain of wheat. The grain is the same and is equal to 65 mg. The troy and apothecaries' ounces contain 480 grains; the avoirdupois ounce contains 437.5 grains.

grain

(1) An obsolete, non-SI (International System) unit of weight formerly used by pharmacists, equal to 0.0648 g. 
(2) A nonspecific term for any granule particle (e.g., a psammoma body), seen by light microscopy; the term is no longer used in pathology.
(3) A cereal plant—e.g., barley, oat, wheat—or seed thereof.

grain

(gr) (grān)
1. Cereal plants (e.g., corn, wheat, or rye), or a seed of one of them.
2. A minute, hard particle of any substance, as of sand.
3. A unit of weight, 1/60 dram (apoth. or troy), 1/437.5 avoirdupois ounce, 1/480 troy ounce, 1/5760 troy pound, 1/7000 avoirdupois pound; the equivalent of 0.064799 gram.
[L. granum]

grain

(gr) (grān)
1. One of the cereal plants, or its seed.
2. A hard, minute particle of any substance, e.g., sand.
3. The grain is obsolete as a unit in dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, and nursing. Avoid abbreviationgr, which is subject to frequent misinterpretation. A unit of weight equivalent to 64.79 mg.
4. A particle of a silver halide in a photographic emulsion.
[L. granum]

grain (gr),

n 1. a unit of weight equal to 0.0648 g.
n 2. a crystal of an alloy.
grain boundary,
n the junction of two grains growing from different nuclei, impinging and causing discontinuity of the lattice structure. Important in corrosion and brittleness of metals.
grain growth,

grain

1. a seed, especially of a cereal plant; for best results in feeding the seed may be rolled, cracked, flaked (below).
2. the twentieth part of a scruple: 0.065 g; abbreviated gr. See also Table 4.2.
3. the texture and patterned appearance of the outside of leather.
4. the size and nature of the crystals of the fluorescent salt used in intensifying screens and also the size and nature of silver halide crystals used in photographic emulsion.

grain engorgement
flaked grain
grain that has been cooked and then rolled flat. The digestibility is greatly enhanced but the process is costly.
grain fumigants
substances used to fumigate silos full of grain to kill insect pests. Use of these agents other than as recommended by the makers may lead to poisoning. See also methyl bromide.
high-moisture grain
see moist grain storage.
grain itch mites
micronized grain
heated in a dry heat then rolled.
grain overload
popped grain
grain passed across a heated plate and popped like popcorn.
grain rash
grain itch mite dermatitis.
roasted grain
roasted in dry heat but not popped.
grain screenings
debris from a grain batch that is removed by passing it over a screen. Has some feeding value but this varies with the mix of contents.
grain sorghum
Sorghum bicolor (S. vulgare).
spent grain
grain used in brewing or liquor production that has been exhausted of its carbohydrate; includes brewer's grains, distiller's grains.
sprouted grain

Patient discussion about grain

Q. What and how much intake should I have 1. Vegetables, 2. Fruits and whole grain… I am 21 years old and would like to know that in order to get the required fiber per day what and how much intake should I have 1. Vegetables, 2. Fruits and whole grain…

A. actually men under 50 should have 38 grams a day of fiber. here is a nice article about fiber consuming and a list of foods that contain fiber and the amount of it:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/fiber/NU00033/METHOD=print

More discussions about grain
References in periodicals archive ?
Summing up, it's Against The Grain for me, to be followed home by Royal Dignitary, Marshman and Pacific Pride.
By concluding my editorial with these words from bell hooks, I am not suggesting that the only relationship of teacher education to society is a critical one, nor that the only goal of preservice education is to prepare prospective teachers to teach against the grain.
Rubbing against the grain gently will tell you in a second where there are still long hairs.
To that end, Against The Grain is fancied to defy his initial assessment and reward support by remaining unbeaten.
Crest operations manager Jay Martin said Against the Grain was the latest of three community-based recycling enterprises to be set up in Conwy county by the co-operative.
Vortex, comprised of president Rick Marek and his colleagues, principals Scott Grayson and Vincent Tuminelli, does not see itself as going against the grain.
Health journalist Melissa Diane Smith writes in Going Against the Grain, "Whole grains cause lower blood sugar responses than refined grains.
They] inspired me to be independent and always go against the grain if the grain was not helpful to the whole cause.
Cooke provides insights into the man, his research, and the politics involved in his pursuits against the grain of the research establishment.
London's move angered religious leaders, who say homosexuality goes against the grain of the deeply religious and socially conservative islands.
Since then the STFU has been featured in Anthony Dunbar's neglected account of the religious radicals who challenged the shibboleths of the interwar south, Against the Grain (1981); Robert Martins 1991 biography of Howard Kester, a Christian socialist and STFU organizer; and Jack Temple Kirby's survey of the impact of modernization on the twentieth century South, Rural Worlds Lost (1987), among others.
Its author seems to expect, even welcome, the controversy that this experiment will provoke and explicitly states her wish to imitate the slave narratives by challenging both liberal humanism and Western metaphysics while at the same time going against the grain of critics who tend to overemphasize aesthetics, anthropology, or sociology in their readings of African American literature.