afterload


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afterload

 [af´ter-lōd]
the tension developed by the heart during contraction; it is an important determinant of myocardial energy consumption, as it represents the resistance against which the ventricle must pump and indicates how much effort the ventricles must put forth to force blood into the systemic circulation. Factors that increase afterload include aortic and pulmonarystenosis, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, and high peripheral resistance.

af·ter·load

(af'ter-lōd),
1. The arrangement of a muscle so that, in shortening, it lifts a weight from an adjustable support or otherwise does work against a constant opposing force to which it is not exposed at rest.
2. The load or force thus encountered in shortening.

Afterload

Cardiology The amount of haemodynamic pressure (peripheral vascular resistance) downstream from the heart, which increased in heart failure secondary to aortic stenosis and hypertension. Cf Preload.
Physiology The tension produced by heart muscle after contraction.

afterload

Cardiology The amount of hemodynamic pressure–peripheral vascular resistance downstream from the heart–which ↑ in heart failure 2º to aortic stenosis and HTN. Cf Preload Physiology The tension produced by heart muscle after contraction.

af·ter·load

, after-load (af'tĕr-lōd)
1. The arrangement of a muscle so that, in shortening, it creates a force from an adjustable support or otherwise work against an opposing force to which it is not exposed at rest.
2. The load or force thus encountered in shortening.
3. That resistance against which the left ventricle must eject its volume of blood during contraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aortix can disrupt the harmful cardiorenal cycle in two ways: above the pump, it rests the heart by reducing aortic root pressure (afterload) resulting in increased cardiac output and decreased cardiac work; downstream, it provides increased blood flow to the kidneys resulting in increased urine output and a reduction in fluid overload.
The management of ApHCM is mainly symptomatic using medications such as beta-blockers or nondihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers to control the heart rate, and also angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) to reduce the left ventricle afterload and adverse cardiac remodeling.
The presystolic deflation of the balloon reduces afterload, consequently decreasing myocardial workload, resulting in reduced myocardial oxygen demand.
The most consistent haemodynamic response to acute aortic occlusion is an abrupt increase in afterload with a resultant increase in proximal aortic pressure.
These compensatory mechanisms include increased pre-load (volume and pressure or myocardial fiber length of the ventricle before contraction), increased afterload (vascular resistance), ventricular hypertrophy (increased muscle mass), and dilation (Arcangelo, Peterson, Wilbur, & Reinhold, 2017).
On the basis of product type, Centrifugal Blood Pump are broadly categorized into three types including non -- occlusive centrifugal pump, preload dependent centrifugal pump, and afterload dependent centrifugal pump.
Acute cor pulmonale (ACP) is common in severe ARDS patients and is always ignored.[34] The prevalence rate of echocardiographically evident ACP in ARDS ranges from 22.0% to 50.0%.[35] Treatment of ACP in ARDS includes optimization of right ventricle preload and afterload; increased right ventricle contractility, pulmonary vasodilators, and lung protective ventilation are the important methods for reducing right ventricle afterload.
Accordingly, when there is an increase in afterload, wall thickness will increase which is an adaptive process in order to maintain wall stress normal.
(6) Bu durum sag kalbe olan venoz donusu (preload) ve akciger venoz basinci arttirirken sol ventrikul onundeki (afterload) yuku de artirarak akciger kapiller basincin artisina neden olmaktadir.
The primary goal in such cases is to maintain a heart rate of 80 to 100 beats / min, reduce the afterload and to offer adequate depth of anesthesia.
The basic principles for anaesthetizing a patient with cardiac disease are maintaining both afterload and preload along with a sinus rhythm.