afterglow

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afterglow

small amounts of light emitted by a phosphor after the stimulating radiation has ceased. Seen in x-ray intensifying screens and fluoroscopic screens.
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2-meter telescope in Southern California spotted a visible-light flash that brightened dramatically within about an hour, fitting the profile of a burst's afterglow.
Over the following 10 minutes, RINGO2 collected 5,600 photographs of the burst afterglow while the properties of the magnetic field were still encoded in its captured light.
Unlike the many hundreds of GRB afterglows seen by Swift over the last four years, the afterglow of GRB 080319B showed a signature of not just one jet pointed in our direction, but two.
Within the next 2 years, he says, astronomers will document gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows at distances more remote than those of the galaxies and quasars that now are the most-distant light-emitting objects known.
Screening from thick molecular clouds provides a natural explanation for so-called "dark bursts," which lack associated afterglows.
Other telescopes, both in space and on the ground, are now studying the burst's afterglow and the region surrounding the burst.
After analyzing the July 9th bursts's fading afterglow, Fox and his colleagues estimated the opening angle of the jet that produced the GRB: about 15[degrees].
Often a burst is followed by a lingering afterglow, at wavelengths from X-rays to visible light to radio, that arises as the jet plows through surrounding interstellar matter in the following hours, days, and weeks.
These and other observations indicate the radio emission is not part of the burst's waning afterglow but is radiation from the burst's home galaxy, she and her colleagues assert.
The accurate position obtained by XRT and UVOT will also be flashed to astronomers worldwide, who will then rush to use ground-based telescopes and other satellites to catch the afterglow before it fades.
Loeb estimates that less than 1 percent of all afterglows are magnified by a lens.