afterglow

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afterglow

small amounts of light emitted by a phosphor after the stimulating radiation has ceased. Seen in x-ray intensifying screens and fluoroscopic screens.
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Whereas afterglows of gamma-ray bursts last only hours or days, quasars shine for millions of years.
But gamma-ray afterglows aren't steady; they're brightest immediately after a burst and then they fade rapidly.
Washington, Jan 7 (ANI): The brilliant afterglow of a powerful gamma-ray burst (GRB) has enabled astronomers to probe the star-forming environment of a distant galaxy, resulting in the first detection of molecular gas in a GRB host galaxy.
Swift calculated the burst's position, beamed the location to a network of observatories, and turned to study the afterglow.
The afterglow contains information about what caused the burst.
Analyzing the X-ray afterglow of four bursts that predated the Feb.
Loeb and Rosalba Perna, then at Harvard-Smithsonian, predicted 2 years ago that the afterglow would appear as a thin, rapidly expanding ring.
Piran and Woosley agree that the visible-light afterglow results from collisions between a jet and interstellar material that occur farther down the road, after the jet has spread out and slowed.
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In addition to these industry-changing features, Afterglow has a long-lasting Lithium-ion battery easily charged through its USB port, a locking key pad and a privacy mode, which allows the user to turn off visible lights.
It's the most distance gamma-ray burst, but it's also the most distant object in the universe overall," said Edo Berger of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a member of the team that observed the afterglow with Gemini North.
If a burst originated so far back in time that stars and quasars hadn't yet ionized the vast reserves of atomic hydrogen in the universe, then its afterglow would have a large absorption gap, or trough, in its spectrum.