afterbirth


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afterbirth

 [af´ter-berth″]
the placenta and fetal membranes expelled from the uterus after childbirth. Called also secundines.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

af·ter·birth

(af'ter-berth),
The placenta and fetal membranes that are extruded from the uterus after birth.
Synonym(s): secundina, secundines
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

afterbirth

(ăf′tər-bûrth′)
n.
The placenta and fetal membranes expelled from the uterus following birth.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

afterbirth

Obstetrics
Placenta and foetal membranes that are normally expelled from the uterus after delivering the infant.
 
Vox populi
A child born after a father’s death or last testament; posthumous birth.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

afterbirth

Obstetrics Placenta and fetal membranes that are normally expelled from the uterus after delivering the infant, ergo, 'after birth'. See Placenta.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

af·ter·birth

(af'tĕr-bĭrth)
The placenta and membranes that are extruded from the uterus after birth of a baby.
Synonym(s): secundines.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

afterbirth

The PLACENTA, the umbilical cord and the ruptured membranes which surrounded the FETUS before birth. These parts are expelled from the womb (UTERUS) within an hour or two of birth.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

afterbirth

the remains of the placenta and umbilical cord that are voided from the uterus of EUTHERIAN mammals after the young is born.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The EU Animal By- Products Regulations 2002 requires animal by-products, including afterbirth material, to be disposed of via an approved route such as rendering, incineration or knackers' yards.
When a tree falls in the Maine woods exposing the remains of a woman, and her afterbirth, the Jewish lawyer Moxie Castin notes that a Star of David was carved on a nearby tree, leading him to retain private detective Charlie Parker to shadow the police investigation and discover what happened to the infant, since no baby was found buried near or with the mother.
What a grandmother!" Beverley even thought to tie a shoe lace around her grandson's umbilical cord when her daughter's afterbirth came before the ambulance arrived.
But it was his mother who had the problem - she had not passed her afterbirth.
The depth of goodwill has led to locals inviting Ardern to take part in the traditional Mori practice of burying the afterbirth in the earth of Te Aroha, a ceremony that signifies the new child's ancestral roots and connection to the land.
Dogs walking on farmland can become infected with Neospora after eating the afterbirth of an infected cow.
He was birthed at my mom's house and I held his afterbirth.
'Afterbirth' for example, begins 'Pain is lonely./It is nothing to do with goodness', and continues to describe a birth in which mother and baby are 'locked in struggle', the child 'mortal and writhing to be out', a 'tiny beloved foe' who, once 'the placenta slopped out, vast and raw,/and the pain went' leaves them clinging to each other 'in truce'.
Her topics are conception, labor pains, your mom has issues: when motherhood becomes a monstrosity, father knows best: the redemption of "bad dads" in horror texts, and afterbirth. Distributed in North America by Turpin Distribution.
Stage 3 is just after the baby has been born, and the fetal membranes, or afterbirth, is expelled.
Afterbirth can be consumed in many ways including tinctures, capsules and smoothies.