affordance


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affordance

A visual cue that offers an intuitive indication of how an object functions—e.g., a door on an electronic device.

Affordance

Erogonomics A visual cue that offers an intuitive indication of how an object functions—e.g., a door on an electronic device. See Icon.

af·ford·ance

(ă-fōr'dăns)
The relationship that exists between the individual and the environment that will facilitate a certain type of movement (e.g., a sliding board affords a child with the opportunity to climb up, sit, and slide down).
[afford + -ance, noun suffix]

affordance

a property of an object or a feature of the environment that offers an organism the opportunity to act in a particular way.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elsewhere we have documented similar dynamic visualization affordances of another, conceptually less-challenging AR device in our ARIEL series of experiments (Yoon & Wang, 2014), which points to the continuing validity and reliability of these results.
Students' experiences with mathematics virtual manipulative apps and their affordances reveal, conceal, and develop mathematical understanding, implying that they can be valuable tools for learning mathematics when thoughtfully implemented.
We analyze the affordances this learning community provides for TLs, with a goal of making visible how the TLs were supported in strengthening the skills and dispositions required to be effective facilitators of evidence-informed conversations that would move their colleagues' thinking and learning forward.
The same affordance can be perceived by users in different ways.
Since environmental affordances are part of one's immediate experience (Gibson, 1986; Heft, 2001), the availability of condoms and other risk reduction tools (e.
So an affordance cannot be measured as we measure in physics" (Gibson, 1979, pages 127-128).
The purpose of this study is to understand the affordances of blogging as PD for science teacher leaders.
The affordance competition hypothesis: A framework for embodied behavior.
The possibility is there in Shakespeare, Lupton suggests, especially viewed through those versions of consent at the margins of the Lockean project and entailing a logic and a temporality distinct from the logic and time of contract: the model of "ecological affordances," for instance, Lupton sees at work in The Taming of the Shrew, the existential dimension of medical consent adumbrated in All's Well That Ends Well, the promise of political universalism harbored in Caliban's imagined legal minority.
For Hemans's contemporaneous readers, the allusion within these lines serves as an affordance directing them to a protestant creed that lies outside the poem: one must look to God and Christian faith for deliverance.
Affordance is the store's effectiveness at communicating the unique benefits and value of each product;