affix

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affix

(a′fiks″) [L. affixus, fastened to]
An element attached to a word that alters its meaning, e.g., a prefix or a suffix.
References in periodicals archive ?
All non-basic affixal (prefixed as well as suffixed) adjectives have been analysed in this research, totalling 3,356.
Two word-formation processes play a role in the formation of adjectives in Old English, both of an affixal nature: prefixation and suffixation.
Its case role is determined by the following suffixes with which it occurs in the affixal string.
The Nancowrv Word: Phonology, Affixal Morphology and Roots of a Nicobarese Language.
With regard to the frequency and distribution of affixal and non-affixal negatives, Tottie observes that the higher frequency of affixal negation in written varieties of English is associated with the higher frequency of premodifying adjectives in writing.
Occasionally one can even coordinate non-head elements of affixal formations, (59) as in (33).
Affixal nouns in Old English: Morphological description, multiple bases and recursivity.
Affixal variation is limited even within the grammatical cases, as only the partitive and the genitive plural endings in table 4 have multiple realizations, and even this variation is partly conditioned by metrical and phonological factors.
These figures don't tell us much, except that it is difficult to find a word-final affixal consonant with a closure, and that if we want to find evidence to back up the 2002 findings for the disjunct boundary, we'll have to look further.
The output of this analytical phase when applied extensively to the vocabulary of a language will be an affixal lexicon where lexical units (affixes and word formation patterns) are organized in semantically coherent classes (in a fashion similar to the organization of the primary lexicon), and each of those classes and their members will have an adequate semantic representation in the format of a Lexical Template (see also section 2).
by looking at the distribution of affixal inflection and irregular past separately.
Gonzalez Torres, Elisa 2009: Affixal Nouns in Old English: Morphological Description, Multiple Bases and Recursivity.