affix

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affix

(a′fiks″) [L. affixus, fastened to]
An element attached to a word that alters its meaning, e.g., a prefix or a suffix.
References in periodicals archive ?
Variables such as frequency of combination, semantic transparency, affixal salience and expectedness are important for the pattern character of the affix combination; that is, for the capacity of a specific affix combination, as a whole, to function as a mental pattern that serves the analysis and, if productive, the construction of words.
All non-basic affixal (prefixed as well as suffixed) adjectives have been analysed in this research, totalling 3,356.
Two word-formation processes play a role in the formation of adjectives in Old English, both of an affixal nature: prefixation and suffixation.
(9) ka-lcps-u 2-beat-3O 'You beat him.' (10) ka-lcm -ma 2-beat-1SGO 'You beat me.' In intransitive verb conjugation, the prefix <ka-> indexes second person subject in the affixal string.
The Nancowrv Word: Phonology, Affixal Morphology and Roots of a Nicobarese Language.
With regard to the frequency and distribution of affixal and non-affixal negatives, Tottie observes that the higher frequency of affixal negation in written varieties of English is associated with the higher frequency of premodifying adjectives in writing.
Affixal nouns in Old English: Morphological description, multiple bases and recursivity.
It is also worth pointing out that in grammatical studies of Estonian, a language closely related to Finnish, an expression type that closely resembles quasi-adpositions has traditionally been called affixal adverb.
The presence of the zero or affixal morpheme (defective form) at the v head may motivates movement of the noun into this position.
Example: the postposition gha may take an affixal, one-word or phrasal complement.
This will be illustrated by analyzing the semantics of the negative affixal class, which includes two main subclasses: the lexical subclass of oppositive affixes and the subclass of reversatives.
Word-formation studies often speak in this regard of "polysemy" or "affixal polysemy".