affinity

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affinity

 [ah-fin´ĭ-te]
1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex.

af·fin·i·ty (A),

(ă-fin'i-tē),
1. In chemistry, the force that impels certain atoms or molecules to bind to or unite with certain other atoms or molecules to form complexes or compounds; chemical attraction.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye or the selective uptake of a dye, chemical, or other substance by a tissue.
3. In psychology and psychiatry, a positive bond or relatedness between people or groups, or a person's positive regard for an object, idea, or activity; a positive cathexis.
4. In immunology, the strength of interaction between an antigen binding site and an antigenic determinant.
5. A biomolecular interaction exhibiting specificity.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

(ə-fĭn′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. affini·ties
a. An attraction or force between particles or chemicals that causes them to combine.
b. The degree to which particles or chemicals are likely to combine: Hemoglobin has a high affinity for oxygen. Also called avidity.

Affinity

(1) An inherent relationship.
(2) A special attraction for a specific element, organ, or structure.
Chemistry
(1) The intensity of a force that binds atoms in molecules; the tendency of substances to combine by a chemical reaction.
(2) The strength of noncovalent binds between two substances, as measured by the dissociation constant of the complex.
(3) The reciprocal of the dissociation constant.
Developmental biology The degree to which one substance is attracted to another.
Immunology
(1) A thermodynamic expression of the strength of the interaction between a single antigen binding site and a single antigenic determinant (and thus of the stereochemical compatibility between them), most accurately applied to interactions among simple, uniform antigenic determinants such as haptens.
(2) The sum of the strengths of multiple binding sites between an antibody and an antigen, which increased stability of the linkage, as measured by the association or affinity constant.

af·fin·i·ty

(ă-fin'i-tē)
1. chemistry The force that impels certain atoms to unite with certain others.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye.
3. The strength of binding between a Fab site of an antibody and an antigenic determinant.
4. In a general sense, an attraction.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

The strength of binding between a receptor, such as an ANTIGEN binding site on an antibody, and a LIGAND, such as an EPITOPE on an antigen.

affinity

  1. the relationship of one organism to another in terms of its evolution.
  2. the strength of binding between molecules, for example an ANTIBODY and an ANTIGEN.
References in periodicals archive ?
To the extent that The Affinities is successful--and I think it is--depends far more on the former than the latter" GARY K.
Wilson's treatment of social networks and their user discontents in The Affinities is thought provoking and disturbingly plausible--a hallmark of the author, even when dealing with future tech--and the characters believable and rounded (aside, perhaps, from a patriarch who's too unlikable, if that's possible).
"The deal offers the supporters some real savings on their bills and we are delighted to be partnering with Scottish Power and the Football Affinities Club to bring RedEnergy to market."
UTILITY PLAYERS: James Riley (right), of Football Affinities, with Aberdeen legend Willie Miller, who captained the victorious 1982/83 European Cup Winners' Cup side against Real Madrid.
James Riley, Football Affinities Club managing director, said: 'We can generate a substantial income for these clubs from the supporters who buy their utilities and telecoms services through the scheme.'
For example, the model indicates that roughly 1 percent of an antibody's variants have higher affinities for the antigen.
The team first measured the estrogens' affinities for two estrogen receptors, ER[Alpha] and ER[Beta], as compared to estradiol, the form of estrogen normally found in the body.