aestivation


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aestivation

(ĕs′tə-vā′shən)
n.
Variant of estivation.

es·ti·va·tion

(es'ti-vā'shŭn)
Living through the summer in a quiescent, torpid state.
Synonym(s): aestivation.

aestivation

  1. (in animals) a state of dormancy during the summer or dry season. Compare HIBERNATION.
  2. (in plants) the arrangement of the various parts of the bud of a flower.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A shorter 30-day experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between the size of the animals and the rate of water loss during aestivation. Wild-caught snails (n = 150), ranging from 5 to 138 g (shell height 15-63 mm), aestivating in air were weighed daily for 1 month.
Aestivation was the target of many studies, hence lots of aspects of its physiology and biochemistry were elucidated, notably for the animal groups-anuran amphibians and pulmonate land snails [42].
Corolla aestivation: valvate = 0; convolute/contorte = 1; imbricate/quincuncial = 2.
In his Flora Franciscana (Greene, 1891) he placed this unique species in a special group of the genus Streptanthus characterized by "Calyx very irregular, the uppermost sepal greatly enlarged, in aestivation conduplicate over the others".
Income breeding allows an aquatic snake Seminatrix pygaea to reproduce normally following prolonged drought-induced aestivation. J.
While there was variation in techniques among the studies we reviewed, all surveys were conducted during peak activity periods, between movement from terrestrial aestivation and overwintering areas to aquatic habitats (generally during the last 2 weeks of April), and during the return to aestivation, usually about the second and third week of July.
A number of studies have recorded periods of inactivity, classified as aestivation, in freshwater chelonians (Bury 1979, Litzgus et al.
[6.] Stievenart C Shell morphology, growth, reproduction and aestivation by African snails.
reference to its behaviour during migration and aestivation. Australian Journal of Zoology 2: 223-263.
In Mexico, Kinosternon leucostomum individuals occupying a temporary lake were reported to travel distances of up to 600 m to nesting and aestivation sites (Morales-Verdeja & Vogt 1997).