aesthetic


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aesthetic

adjective
(1) Referring to that which is pleasing to the senses, as in aesthetic (cosmetic) surgery.
(2) Referring to sensation (obsolete).

es·thet·ic

(es-thet'ik)
1. Pertaining to the sensations.
2. Pertaining to esthetics (i.e., beauty).
Synonym(s): aesthetic.
[G. aisthēsis, sensation]

es·thet·ic

(es-thet'ik)
1. Pertaining to the sensations.
2. Pertaining to esthetics (i.e., beauty).
[G. aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
The emergence of criteria by which to judge social practices is not assisted by the present-day standoff between the nonbelievers (aesthetes who reject this work as marginal, misguided, and lacking artistic interest of any kind) and the believers (activists who reject aesthetic questions as synonymous with cultural hierarchy and the market).
The company manufactures and distributes light-based medical and aesthetic devices and offers technical service and clinical support to the practitioners who are mainly in China.
8) Eli Siegel statement quoted in "American Ethics, American Song," special matinee by the Aesthetic Realism Theatre Company in New York City, 1988.
Could it be justifiable to manipulate a species' genetic makeup for completely trivial aesthetic purposes, as is certainly the case with Glofish?
I was looking for some new ideas for teaching Islam, and I had become increasingly fascinated by the aesthetic and spiritual importance of the vocal performance of the Qur'an.
Thus, we should realize that fundamentalist/evangelical culture never was inattentive to the aesthetic dimension of presenting their religious symbols.
Jerrold Levinson engages with issues of objectivism and realism as he draws on Sibley's "seminal essays" and defends the objectivity of aesthetic appraisals as "contingent but stable intersubjective convergence in judgements among qualified perceivers" (p.
Aesthetic has offered the opportunity for many of the people to work and support the Windsor/Vanguard lines.
We may well ask why scholars have so consistently overlooked the analysis of this form of physical and aesthetic expression, practiced socially by many of us, particularly when so much critical attention is lavished on what we passively consume.
1) The attempt to attach objective properties either to the identification of the presence of aesthetic properties OR to aesthetic judgments has been historically unsuccessful.
In the exposition of the different contemporary debates which Fruchtl considers to be exemplary in demonstrating various (however confused) forms of this aesthetic rationality, it becomes clearer what kind of ethical or practical reason he deems part of it.
What, then, is an aesthetic judgement about a scientific theory?