aesthesia


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aesthesia

or

esthesia

(ĕs-thē′zhə)
n.
The ability to feel or perceive sensations.

aesthesia

The ability to perceive a stimulus. Aesthesia has fallen into disuse as an independent term, with the words sensation and sensibility filling the lexical gap; however, the root form, -aesthesia (as in anaethesia, paraesthesia, etc.), is in common active use in the working medical parlance.

Patient discussion about aesthesia

Q. What causes a warm sensation in your foot I have a warm sensation at sole of left foot lasting 5-10 second From time to time I get a warm sensation at the sole of my foot lasting about 5-10 seconds. Started about 2 months ago.

A. Frankly? Although it's tempting to try to give you diagnosis here, these kinds of complaints are so varied and can point to so many different directions I would refrain from doing it. In my opinion you should see a doctor. It's impossible to give a diagnosis based on one line. Sorry...

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References in periodicals archive ?
In the "0.9% sodium chloride" group, the injury area was moisturized with serum physiologic twice everyday under ether aesthesia, and the injury area was covered with sterile gauze bandage, and this process continued for 21 days.
Aesthesia has nothing to do with the objective beauty of a shape, a sentence or a note, since there is no such thing in art as beauty for its own sake.
Aesthetics or aesthesia are labels traditionally applicable to the work of feeling in society.
In our article we stated that the "maintenance of mini surgical and aesthesia capabilities is desirable" and that "the possibility always exists for (adverse) outcomes that can be prevented by doing a rapid emergent cesarean delivery." (1) Unfortunately, rural hospitals and communities may be unable to maintain on-site cesarean delivery and anesthesia capabilities and have the choice of closing their maternity care units or continuing without on site operative facilities.
This is essentially the Stoic doctrine of natural law being a complementary perspective of sympathy and apathy, of organic pathos for kin, and then of distance from them.(28) Or aesthesia and anaesthesia.
The effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine on spinal hyperbaric ropivacaine aesthesia. J Anesth 2010; 24(4):544-8.