aeroallergen


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aeroallergen

(âr′ō-ăl′ər-jən)
n.
Any of various airborne substances, such as pollen or spores, that can cause an allergic response.

airborne allergen

Any substance light enough to be carried by air currents and capable of evoking an immune response. 
Examples Pollens, fungal spores, algae.

aeroallergen

(ar″ō-al′ĕr-jen) [ aero- + allergen]
A particle of dust, pollen, or powder that stimulates an immune response in a sensitive person.

aeroallergen

Airborne particles, especially tree and grass pollens, that can induce allergic responses, such as hay fever (ALLERGIC RHINITIS) in sensitized people.
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of studies have shown a significant impact of climate fluctuation on the status of plants of each area and also on aeroallergens and their public and clinical healths.
Table I.- Comparison of aeroallergen sensitized patients and Healthy controls (non-atopic) group for different parameters of the recruited persons.
Aeroallergen sensitisation was tested using the ISAC test.
In most children with AD, the development of asthma and AR is associated with sensitization to food allergens and/or aeroallergens, while only a small percentage missed atopic diathesis.
A skin prick test was performed using an aeroallergen kit that contained house dust mite, tree pollen, a mixture of herb-grain pollen, fungus, and animal epithelium-dander, and a food allergen kit containing milk and egg.
Geographical variation in the prevalence of positive skin tests to environmental aeroallergens in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey I.
The intact respiratory mucosa has been established to contain no DCs at birth; however, the exposure to biologically active aeroallergens (see Table 1) activates the respiratory epithelium.
Without these spatial-temporal details about the outdoor environment for the study population, it is difficult to empirically examine the impact of climate change on child asthma outcome, even though the hypotheses about these associated pathways (wild fires, change in aeroallergen density, mold, insect population increase, etc.) are plausible.
Twenty-five subjects (50%) were sensitive to aeroallergen, 15 to pollen of Japanese cedar (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.5-2.8), and 10 to Japanese cypress (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.4-2.6), while four (8%) had allergy for both food and inhalant allergens (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.3-6.3).
As assessed by multivariate logistic regression analysis including age, history of wheezing, aeroallergen, family history in the model, RV infection was independently associated with a higher risk of earlier wheezing episodes (OR, 3.441; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.187-9.979; p = 0.023); eosinophilia and leukocytosis were more often observed in children with RV infection (OR, 11.584, 95% CI, 1.080-124.224; p = 0.043, OR, 1.188, 95% CI, 1.070-1.320; p = 0.001).