aerial respiration

aerial respiration

a process of gas exchange occurring in terrestrial and some aquatic organisms, by which oxygen is absorbed from the air and carbon dioxide released. Respiratory surfaces are usually internal (e.g. the MESOPHYLL of leaves, the TRACHEAE of insects, the LUNG BOOKS of spiders and scorpions, and the LUNGS of land vertebrates), although some respiratory organs are external, e.g. the SKIN of amphibia. All surfaces rely on a water layer for gas exchange and may also depend on a blood system for transport of gases to and from distant parts of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
operant conditioning of aerial respiration results in snails attempting to open their respiratory orifice, the pneumostome, significantly less often (Lukowiak et al., 1996).
This concentration of epicatechin has been used previously (Fruson et al., 2012) and was chosen following studies that showed that this concentration did not significantly alter normal homeostatic behaviors (e.g., aerial respiration and locomotion).
(10.) Grizzle JM and Thiyagarajah A: Skin histology of Rivulus ocellatus marmoratus: apparent adaptation for aerial respiration. Copeia 1987: 237-240, 1987.
Morphological adaptations include the expansion of gill surface area and the presence of specialized organs for aerial respiration, whereas behavioral and physiological adaptations include lower levels of activity, changes in respiration rate, an increased use of the water-air interface, lower metabolic rates, and variations in the hemoglobin concentration in the blood (e.g., Hochachka, 1982; Kramer, 1987; Graham, 1997; Chapman et al., 2002).
Aerial respiration in the banded knife fish Gymnotus carapo (Teleostei: Gymnotoidei).

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