advocate

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Advocate

Ethics noun A person who acts on the behalf of or speaks for another—e.g., for a cause or plea, often in the context of a legal proceeding.
verb To act or speak for another person or group of persons.
Law A person who speaks on behalf of others, protecting their rights.
MedspeakUK A person who can support a service user or carer through contact with health services. Advocates will attend meetings with patients and help service users or carers to express concerns or wishes to health care professionals. Although many people can act as an advocate (friend, relative, member of staff), advocacy services can be accessed through an NHS Trust.

advocate

Ethics noun (pron. ad´ ve ket) A person who acts on the behalf of or speaks for another–eg, for a cause or plea. See Amicus curiæ verb (pron. ad ve ka´t) To act or speak for another person or group of person

ad·vo·cate

(ad'vŏ-kăt)
nursing A person who speaks on behalf of another.
[L. advocatus, counsel, supporter, fr. advoco, to consult]

advocate,

n 1. in the medical field, a person who focuses on bolstering the patient's role and rights in making decisions about his or her health care.
2. one who assists another in legal matters; can be a professional or a layperson; may or may not work for a fee.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amidst a variety of artistically elaborate episedic circumstance the narrator, then, succeeds in the advocation of the superiority of Isis, the esoteric dimension of whose character is so much more poignant than the adventurous spirit of wicked witches.
Green Isle is neither an advocation of a naive return to a mythical past nor a dystopia showing the dangers of progress.
Among the numerous international honors bestowed upon her for her advocation of democracy are the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize, the 1991 Sakharov Prize from the European Parliament, the 1993 Jawaharlal Nehru Award from India, and the United States Presidential Medal of Freedom.
This is an advocation of journalistic cowardice of the highest order.
Speaking of politics, he said: "Up here in the North we have a minister for the environment who has just banned a TV advert advocation energy conservation by switching off houselights.
Thus, the advocation that satisfied employees provide a higher level of external service quality, which can lead to increased customer satisfaction (Johnson 1996, Griffith 2001).
All of these dreadful scourges could be cured by the advocation of one policy which has two simple words: birth control.
Watts was chosen because she has been "instrumental in connecting arts and culture in advocation for arts education and the importance of the individual artist.
School Board of Okeechobee County, held that Morse did not apply to GSA First Amendment claims because a "GSA's intent to gain recognition as a noncurricular student group is entirely dissimilar from the advocation of illegal drug use.
11) advocation for nurse residency programs and other initiatives that support the integration of new graduates into practice, and support research efforts to determine how best to support new grads, toward the goals of increased retention and improved clinical performance.
His advocation of vegetarianism, teetotaling, support for local farms and merchants and his support of votes for women will seem familiar to readers today.
Compared to the earlier advocation of violence being associated with the Portuguese coming (K.