advertising

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Advertising

The public notification of a product’s availability and related activities for its promotion, usually in the form of a paid announcement, which may be printed or broadcast.
Advertising types that impact on health care
• Physician advertising
• Prescription drug advertising In the US, the FDA regulates the pharmaceutical industry and the manner in which it promotes its products, and requires a “fair balance” in advertising, such that all activities must present an even account of the clinically relevant information, i.e., the risks and benefits, that would influence the physician’s prescribing decision.
• Abuse substance advertising for tobacco and alcohol

advertising

The public notification of a product's availability and related activities for its promotion Medical communication A public notice, usually in the form of a paid announcement, which may be printed or broadcast. See 'Coming soon advertising' Direct-to-consumer advertising, Institutional advertising, Introductory advertising, Remedial advertising, Reminder advertising, Sexist advertising. , Tobacco advertising.

advertising,

n a paid form of nonpersonal presentation and promotion of ideas, goods, or services by an identified sponsor.

advertising

the making of public statements about services offered and facilities available in a professional practice. Personal advertisement in this way is frowned upon because of the risk that there will be misrepresentation and that it will unfairly attract business to the detriment of the client. The contrary view is that the public is disadvantaged because they will not be aware of the range of services offered and the fees attached to them. In most countries now, in which it used to be controlled by the registering authority, the scope of personal advertising is left to the discretion of the individual. Corporate advertising which advertises the profession as a whole is encouraged.
References in classic literature ?
The other, smiling straight at him, uttered very slowly: "You've been advertising for your son, I believe?
The old man was advertising for me then, and a chum I had with me had a no- tion of getting a couple quid out of him by writ- ing a lot of silly nonsense in a letter.
Gambit could go away from the chief grocer's without fear of rivalry, but not without a sense that Lydgate was one of those hypocrites who try to discredit others by advertising their own honesty, and that it might be worth some people's while to show him up.
John Long--that's the kind of fellow we call a charlatan, advertising cures in ways nobody knows anything about: a fellow who wants to make a noise by pretending to go deeper than other people.