advertising

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Advertising

The public notification of a product’s availability and related activities for its promotion, usually in the form of a paid announcement, which may be printed or broadcast.
Advertising types that impact on health care
• Physician advertising
• Prescription drug advertising In the US, the FDA regulates the pharmaceutical industry and the manner in which it promotes its products, and requires a “fair balance” in advertising, such that all activities must present an even account of the clinically relevant information, i.e., the risks and benefits, that would influence the physician’s prescribing decision.
• Abuse substance advertising for tobacco and alcohol

advertising

The public notification of a product's availability and related activities for its promotion Medical communication A public notice, usually in the form of a paid announcement, which may be printed or broadcast. See 'Coming soon advertising' Direct-to-consumer advertising, Institutional advertising, Introductory advertising, Remedial advertising, Reminder advertising, Sexist advertising. , Tobacco advertising.

advertising

the making of public statements about services offered and facilities available in a professional practice. Personal advertisement in this way is frowned upon because of the risk that there will be misrepresentation and that it will unfairly attract business to the detriment of the client. The contrary view is that the public is disadvantaged because they will not be aware of the range of services offered and the fees attached to them. In most countries now, in which it used to be controlled by the registering authority, the scope of personal advertising is left to the discretion of the individual. Corporate advertising which advertises the profession as a whole is encouraged.
References in periodicals archive ?
I suddenly realized that Tiffany was one of the largest and oldest advertisers at the Times, always in the favored position: upper right, page three.
Sign leases between advertisers and Sign Mavens (as agent for an owner or as sublessor under a lease with an owner) seldom exceed six or seven pages, whereas agreements between building owners and office tenants often run to many multiples of that.
And, even as the networks say they're catering to what advertisers want, advertisers are indicating that they're often frustrated with the offerings - and are looking for more control over the product.
Still, on my voluminous list of common media sins, caring in to brutish advertisers ranks fairly low.