Seizure

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Related to adversive seizure: audiogenic seizure, focal motor seizure

seizure

 [se´zhur]
1. the sudden attack or recurrence of a disease.
2. a convulsion or attack of epilepsy.
absence seizure the seizure seen in petit mal epilepsy, marked by a momentary break in the stream of thought and activity, accompanied by a symmetrical spike and wave at 3 cycles per second on the electroencephalogram. Called also petit malseizure. See epilepsy.
atonic seizure an absence seizure characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone.
complex partial seizure see partial seizure.
febrile seizure febrile convulsion.
focal seizure partial seizure.
focal motor seizure a simple partial seizure consisting of clonus or spasm of a muscle or muscle group, occurring either singly or in a continuous repetitive series.
generalized tonic-clonic seizure (grand mal seizure) the seizure seen in grand mal epilepsy, marked by loss of consciousness and generalized tonic convulsions followed by clonic convulsions. See epilepsy.
jackknife s's infantile spasms.
myoclonic seizure one characterized by a brief episode of myoclonus.
partial seizure any seizure due to a lesion in a specific, known area of the cerebral cortex; symptoms vary with different lesion locations. A simple partial seizure is the most localized type, with a discharge that is predominantly one-sided or presents localized features without loss of consciousness. A complex partial seizure is associated with disease of the temporal lobe and characterized by varying degrees of impairment of consciousness. See epilepsy.
petit mal seizure absence seizure.
reflex seizure (sensory seizure) an epileptic seizure in response to a sensory stimulus, which may be tactile, visual, auditory, or musical.
simple partial seizure see partial seizure.
tonic-clonic seizure see generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

sei·zure (Sz),

(sē'zhŭr),
1. An attack; the sudden onset of a disease or of certain symptoms.
2. An epileptic attack. Synonym(s): convulsion (2)
[O. Fr. seisir, to grasp, fr. Germanic]

seizure

(sē′zhər)
n.
A sudden attack, spasm, or convulsion, as in epilepsy or another disorder.

seizure

Neurology A sudden convulsion, due to temporary disruption in electrical activity of the brain Clinical Uncontrollable body movements, sense of unusual smells or tastes, loss of consciousness
Seizures classification
Partial seizures
Simple partial seizures–consciousness preserved
 Motor signs–jacksonian, adversive
 Somatosensory or special sensory symptoms
 Autonomic symptoms or signs
 Psychiatric symptoms
Complex partial seizures–consciousness impaired
 Simple partial seizure, followed by impaired consciousness
 Impaired consciousness at onset
Secondarily generalized seizures
 Simple partial seizure evolving to generalized tonic-clonic seizures
 Complex partial seizure evolving to generalized tonic-clonic seizures
 Simple partial seizure evolving to complex partial seizures, then to generalized tonic-clonic seizures
Generalized-onset seizures
Tonic-clonic seizure
Absence seizure
Atypical absence seizure
Myoclonic seizure
Tonic seizure
Atonic seizure
Localization-related/focal seizures
Idiopathic
 Benign focal epilepsy of childhood
Symptomatic
 Chronic progressive partial continuous epilepsy
 Temporal lobe epilepsy
 Extratemporal epilepsy
Generalized seizures
Idiopathic
 Benign neonatal convulsions
 Childhood absence epilepsy
 Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy
 Other generalized idiopathic epilepsy
Symptomatic
 West syndrome (infantile spasms)
 Early myoclonic encephalopathy
 Lennox-Gastaut syndrome
 Progressive myoclonic epilepsy
Special syndromes
Febrile seizures
Drug-related seizures  

sei·zure

(sē'zhŭr)
1. An attack; the sudden onset of a disease or of certain symptoms.
2. An epileptic attack.
Synonym(s): convulsion (2) .
[O. Fr. seisir, to grasp, fr. Germanic]

seizure

An episode in which uncoordinated electrical activity in the brain causes sudden muscle contraction, either local (partial seizure) or widespread (generalized seizure). Recurrent seizures are called EPILEPSY. Also known as a fit.

Seizure

A sudden attack, spasm, or convulsion.

sei·zure

(sē'zhŭr)
1. An attack; sudden onset of disease or some symptoms.
2. An epileptic attack.
Synonym(s): convulsion (2) .
[O. Fr. seisir, to grasp, fr. Germanic]

Patient discussion about Seizure

Q. SEIZURE what are the causes of a person having a seizure?

A. thank you for the link i will order it--mrfoot56

Q. is there ususlly strange feelings associated with seizures? I am 30 years and i have just been diagnosed with absence seizures. There are some strange feeing that i cannot identify as fear or fustration or anxiety or depression or sadness associated with this new illness. Is it normal? Can it be identified? How can i get rid of all the conditions associated with this disease as well as the absence seizure itself?

A. any affect that the seizures have on your personality (mood change and such)can go away if the condition will be treated. treating epilepsy seizures require first of all a good neurologist. he will help you the treatment that will suite you the most. there are more then one line of treatments in epilepsy.

Q. what are the chances for a one time epileptic seizure? I had an epileptic seizure a few years ago and after all the tests it appeared to be a one time seizure. I know having one indicates my tendency for this kind of seizures so should I be afraid now to do things that might bring it up again- like alcohol, drugs, being exposed to flashing lights or having lack of sleep? what are the chances of it to come back after 5 years? any help will be very appreciated....thanks!

A. After 5 years with no recurrence of seizures after a one time episode, tha chances of having another one are low, almost exact to the general population. I would not advise you to start heavily drinking alcohol and doing drugs, because these things can certainly have an effect, however you need not be afraid.

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