adverse

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Related to adverseness: averseness

adverse

opposing the interests of the patient.

adverse drug reaction (ADR)
an undesirable and unintentional effect caused by a drug administered at the normal therapeutic dose.
adverse food reaction
an abnormal response to ingested food components. It may be immunologic or non-immunologic. See also food.
adverse syndrome
lesions of the rostral thalamus causing head turning, circling or deviation of the eyes toward the side of the lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the case seemed to have more to do with injury than adverseness.
injured plaintiff can assure the concrete adverseness in a case
In other words, it goes to the core question, the "gist" of standing: whether the plaintiff is in a position to allege "such a personal stake in the outcome of the controversy as to assure that concrete adverseness which sharpens the presentation of issues.
Stock prices are being driven by one simple factor: a drop in risk adverseness.
195) Though standing has been justified on a number of grounds, one of the most frequently invoked is the doctrine's requirement that the plaintiff allege "such a personal stake in the outcome of the controversy as to assure that concrete adverseness which sharpens the presentation of issues upon which the court so largely depends for illumination of difficult constitutional questions[.
Moreover, given the judiciary's inherently passive role in the adversary system, absent the incentives to compile and present evidence and argument created by the adverseness requirement, we cannot be assured that a court will have sufficient information to enforce the laws fashioned by the other branches.
222) Justice Brandeis, writing for the Court, held that naturalization proceedings are proper exercises of the judicial power despite the lack of concrete adverseness until (and unless) naturalization is denied and the question goes up on appeal.
186, 204 (1962) (noting that whether a party has standing is a question of whether the party has "alleged such a personal stake in the outcome of the controversy as to assure that concrete adverseness which sharpens the presentation of issues upon which the court so largely depends").
62) In that statement, Justice Powell highlighted several of the same general purposes as standing law, including adverseness, concreteness, and the separation of powers.
To the extent that the redressability requirement stems from the case or controversy limitation in Article III, redressability ensures adverseness, limits the role of ideological plaintiffs, and prevents courts from needlessly resolving disputes that might embroil them in controversy with the more politicized branches.
In the Hart & Wechsler paradigm, issues of standing, mootness, and ripeness turn on such considerations as the adverseness of the parties, how pressing is the need to decide an issue, whether the facts are sufficiently developed to permit effective adjudication, and whether judicial intervention would intrude on the prerogatives of the other branches.
497,517 (2007) ("At bottom, 'the gist of the question of standing' is whether petitioners have 'such a personal stake in the outcome of the controversy as to assure that concrete adverseness which sharpens the presentation of issues upon which the court so largely depends for illumination.