adverse reaction


Also found in: Acronyms.

ad·verse re·ac·tion

any undesirable or unwanted consequence of a preventive, diagnostic, or therapeutic procedure or regimen.

adverse reaction

any harmful, unintended effect of a medication, diagnostic test, or therapeutic intervention.

Adverse Effect

Malpractice An injury caused by medical management—rather than by the underlying disease—which prolongs hospitalization, produces a disability at the time of discharge, or both.
Aetiology Drug effects, wound infections, technical complications, negligence, diagnostic or therapeutic mishaps, and events occurring in A&E.
Therapeutics An undesirable and unintended, although not necessarily unexpected, result of therapy or other intervention—e.g., headache following spinal tap or intestinal bleeding associated with aspirin therapy.
Toxicology An abnormal or harmful effect on an organism due to exposure to a chemical or noxious substance. Adverse events cause functional or anatomic damage, irreversible changes in homeostasis, or increased susceptibility to other chemical or biologic stress.
Clinical findings Change in food or liquid consumption, body or organ weight, enzyme activity, visible illness or death. Nonadverse effects usually fade when the organism is distanced from the toxin.
Trial Any undesirable symptom, occurrence or effect which a trial subject experiences during the trial, which may or may not be related to the study agent or intervention.
Examples Unfavourable and unintended reactions or findings—e.g., abnormal lab results, symptoms, or disease temporally associated with the use of a medicinal (investigational) product, whether or not it actually is related to the product.

The term adverse effect is often used interchangeably with adverse reaction, which might be better reserved for clinical phenomena occurring during drug treatment when causality cannot be or is not ascertained.

ad·verse re·ac·tion

(ad-vĕrs' rē-ak'shŭn)
Any undesirable or unwanted consequence of a preventive, diagnostic, or therapeutic procedure or regimen.

adverse reaction,

n a harmful, unintended effect of a medication, diagnostic test, or therapeutic intervention.
References in periodicals archive ?
VVR were the most common adverse reaction occurring in 67-95% of all donation-related reactions and in 1-5% of blood donors.
When the duration between blood donation and time since last meal were studied 46% of the total reactions occurred in the donors who donated blood within 0-1 hour since their last meal, which can be due to sudden shift of the fluid to the vascular compartment during bleeding, the most common adverse reaction being nausea/vomiting, while the third highest number reactions accounting to 18% of total reactions were seen when the duration between last meal and blood donation was more than 4 hours is due to hypoglycemia.
Confusion over the adverse reaction terminology pertaining to acupuncture is likely to be an influential factor in the number and type of incidents registered with PNZ.
CHICAGO - Severe cutaneous adverse reactions requiring hospitalization occurred in 45 of 90,358 patients who began allopurinol treatment within a specified time period, for an incidence rate of 0.
According to recent statistics, as many as 825 patients had adverse reactions to drugs prescribed by physicians last year while 555 cases of medical errors were reported to the Health Authority -- Abu Dhabi (HAAD).
You don't need to have all the details in order to report an adverse reaction, or even be certain that a health product caused the reaction.
However, any drug could cause adverse reactions that are usually listed in the leaflet.
If there is a clinically important increase in the rate of a serious suspected adverse reaction, over that listed in the protocol or IB, this too is reportable.
They concluded that adverse reaction rates did not affect future participation in community directed treatment with ivermectin, as adequate community mobilization with health education messages were in place.
Serious Adverse Reaction (SAR): Multiple definitions are possible and no single one is correct in all situations.
We have in place the Yellow Card Scheme which helps us identify previously unrecognised suspected adverse reactions.