adv.

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Related to adverb: preposition

adv.

Abbreviation for L. adversum, against.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Munaro's account, which also follows Kayne (1998), the focusing adverb attracts the focus to its Spec (this is represented by step (1) in figure 1, below), followed by the movement of the focusing adverb to the head immediately above (see step (2) in the figure), and, subsequently, by the movement of the remnant (see (3) in figure 1).
In this sentence, the word good is used incorrectly to modify the verb cooks and should be changed to its adverb form, well.
The adverb evidently, on the other hand, which might well be expected among the most frequent modal adverbs in judicial reasoning based on logic and tangible evidence, was used rather infrequently.
To use a conjunctive adverb or conjunctive adverbial phrase correctly, you must first think clearly about the relationship between the clauses and sentences that you wish to connect.
Where one and the same form appears to perform syntactic functions ascribed to the category adjective and also to the category adverb, as in (8) and (9) below, it does so as the result of a set of specific processes that entail lexical change and where a contrast between literal and figurative meaning exists, i.
An important consequence of this is that there are instances in which the adverb cannot be formed by productive means in Old English, which is tantamount to saying that no affixes can be distinguished from the perspective of contemporary morphological analysis.
Share out the adverb cards: quietly, cautiously, noisily etc.
Thus this article intends to analyze the way some students, and experienced English teachers treat faulty sentences with adverb placement errors.
More specifically, we aim at defining the lexical categories Noun, Adjective, Verb, Adverb, and Adposition in such a way that: (i) the explanatory (semantic) requisites for the definition of the domains of the layered structure of the clause are satisfied; (ii) the descriptive (morphological) requisites for the definition of the lexical items of a dynamic functional lexicon are satisfied.
Evaluative adverbs express an emotion or evaluation towards the propositional content of a sentence--examples in English are sadly, luckily, fortunately.
Based on the theory of linguistic universal and Second Language Acquisition (SLA), the paper discusses the acquisition of syntactic positions of adverbs in English.
The book, entitled Adverbs, will reportedly feature a collection of 17 interrelated stories relating to love.