advance directive


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Related to advance directive: Durable power of attorney

ad·vance di·rec·tive

a legal document giving instructions as to the type and degree of medical care to be administered in the event that the person signing the document becomes mentally incompetent during the course of a terminal illness, or becomes permanently comatose (that is, persistent vegetative state).
See also: living will.

State legislatures have enacted so-called Death with Dignity Laws to protect the rights of patients to refuse medical care, including life-prolonging and palliative care in terminal illness, as well as to clarify the role of physicians and indemnify them against the accusation of euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide when they withhold such care in compliance with patients' wishes. These laws spell out strict procedural requirements, including the need for the signing of an advance directive to be duly witnessed, and make it easier to revoke an advance directive than to establish one. When an advance directive provides instructions for the types of care the patient does or does not want to receive, it is known as a living will. When it names another person to make such decisions, it is known as a durable power-of-attorney for health care decisions. An advance directive can contain both types of instruction. An agent making end-of-life decisions on behalf of a patient is required to follow the patient's instructions, interpreting them when necessary in the light of the patient's personal philosophy, religious beliefs, and ethical values, and with due consideration for the likelihood that the patient will regain competency or will recover.

advance directive

n.
A legal document in which the signer gives directions or designates another person to make decisions regarding the signer's health care if the signer becomes incapable of making such decisions.

Advance Directive

A verbal or written statement or statements by an individual which delineate not only those medical treatments that he/she does not want in the event that he/she becomes incapable of making an informed decision in the future, but also those that he/she finds acceptable.

advance directive

Advance medical directive, self-determination Medical ethics Instruction(s) that provide a mentally competent person with a
Advance directive types
Living will,
in which the person outlines-usually in writing, specific treatment guidelines to be followed by health care providers
Health care proxy
Power of attorney for healthcare decision making, proxy to make the health care decisions. The person designates a trusted individual to make medical decisions in the event of inability to make such decisions
  vehicle for directing his/her own treatment in the event of serious illness and/or loss of mental ability to communicate those wishes; in an AD, the person indicates in advance, how treatment decisions are to be made with regard to the use of artificial life support. See DNR orders, Durable powers of attorney, Euthanasia, Living will.

ad·vance di·rec·tive

(ăd-vans' dĭr-ek'tiv)
A legal document with written instructions signed by the patient (or the patient's designee if the patient cannot sign) stating the type of care measures and services that are or are not to be provided to prolong life in the event of a life-threatening illness.
Synonym(s): durable power of attorney (1) .

ad·vance di·rec·tive

(ăd-vans' dĭr-ek'tiv)
Legal document giving instructions as to the type and degree of medical care to be administered in the event that the person signing the document becomes mentally incompetent during the course of a terminal illness, or becomes permanently comatose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Q: I recently read about advance directives that deal only with dementia.
In an advance directive education intervention, Ko, Hohman, Lee, Ngo, and Woodruff (2016) provided a single motivational interviewing counseling session matched to the patient's stage of change.
Since 75% of West Virginians repeatedly say in surveys conducted over the past decade that at the end-of-life they would prefer to live a shorter period of time to avoid pain, suffering, and being kept alive on machines, the POST form more than advance directives allows West Virginians with such preferences to be treated according to their wishes and with the emphasis on comfort as opposed to treatments which might increase their suffering.
Issuing an advance directive is so personal that can only be exercised by the right-holder, i.e.
Similar to findings reported by Grady et al., a study conducted by one of these authors (CB and colleague) also found that nurses reported confusion as to what an advance directive actually is, the means of assuring it is a current and valid document and who had primary responsibility for talking with patients about end-of-life issues and securing a valid advance directive.
RN's working in any setting where completion of an advance directive is encouraged or mandatory should a) be very familiar with components of your state's form and the laws that govern that form, b) consider completing their own advance directive so as to have first-hand knowledge of the form and the concept, and c) be able to discuss the importance of completing this form with patients and families.
Advance directives (often called "living wills") give people a way to express their wishes if they become severely ill and unable to make medical decisions for themselves.
a foreign country, the living will can be faxed or e-mailed to the hospital if the patient is too incapacitated to sign that hospital's advance directive.
adult day services centers (ADSCs) maintain documentation of participants' advance directives, according to a report published Sept.
Advance directives are a useful tool for people to communicate their wishes if they become incapacitated and are unable to make their own healthcare decisions, particularly towards the end of life.

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